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American Heart Month

By Tiffany A. Mack, MPH, CHES, CGW
SC PHASE Program Administrator
Division of Diabetes, Heart Disease, Obesity & School Health

February is not only the month of love in which we celebrate Valentine’s Day, it is also American Heart Month. Raising awareness about heart health is key to combating heart disease, which is one of the leading causes of death and disability in the United States.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (cdc.gov/heartdisease/facts.htm), each year more than 600,000 Americans die of heart disease, which accounts for 1 in every 4 deaths in the country.

Why heart health?

The heart is one of the most vital organs of the human body.  This muscle pumps blood through the circulatory system and supplies nutrients and oxygen to the tissues of the body.  Damage to the heart through poor lifestyle habits such as smoking, physical inactivity and diets rich in sodium and saturated fats can cause the heart to not function properly and result in heart disease.

Adults who suffer from chronic conditions have a much higher risk of developing heart disease.  Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to have heart disease than adults without diabetes; people with uncontrolled high blood pressure are three times more likely to die of heart disease; and people with high blood cholesterol have about twice the risk of developing heart disease than people with lower levels (source: DHEC Chronic Disease Epidemiology State of the Heart Fact Sheet, www.scdhec.gov/Library/ML-002149.pdf).

It is important to know that there are many ways heart disease can be prevented and treated to maintain a normal lifestyle, and prevent premature death and disability.

What is DHEC doing?

DHEC’s Division of Diabetes, Heart Disease, Obesity and School Health received funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to focus on preventing obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and stroke in 15 of the 46 counties in South Carolina.  The division is partnering with medical practices to adopt and implement policies and protocols for the improvement of patient health outcomes related to high blood pressure.

What can you do?

One of the best ways to celebrate American Heart Month is to get involved.  Know your numbers. Get routine screenings by your primary care physician to include checking blood pressure, glucose and cholesterol levels.

  • Eat smart. Reduce your sodium intake, and adding more fruits and veggies to your diet.
  • Move more. Add just 10 minutes of moderate activity twice a day.
  • At work you can go for a walk, take the stairs and/or bring a healthy snack to share with your colleagues.
  • Encourage your family and friends to follow your lead by practicing healthier habits for life.

There are many partner organizations that are participating in American Heart Month by conducting awareness and outreach events.  The Heart2Heart Foundation  has been hosting a Statewide Screening Day initiative.  This event was created through a collaboration with the Governor’s Office and SC DHEC.  Please visit StatewideScreeningDay.com and share this with your friends so they can take advantage of these free screenings!

For the remaining days of American Heart Month — and beyond — commit to learning about what you can do to promote heart health and raise awareness about heart disease and heart disease prevention.

More Information:

If you would like more information regarding heart disease and heart healthy tips, visit the DHEC website (www.scdhec.gov/Health/DiseasesandConditions/HeartDiseaseStroke/HeartDisease/) the CDC website (cdc.gov/heartdisease/facts.htm) or the American Heart Association website (heart.org/HEARTORG/).

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Morning News: Smart Mosquito Traps, Flu in Orangeburg, Boil Water Advisory, Random Acts of Kindness

News for February 17:

The high number of flu cases across South Carolina has led to visitation restrictions at the Regional Medical Center in Orangeburg County:

Testament to how widespread the flu is comes from none other than the hospital. The Regional Medical Center has restricted patient visitation temporarily because of influenza.

“We have seen an increase in the number of flu cases as the season has progressed,” RMC Infectious Disease Specialist Dr. John Samies said Wednesday. “To protect our patients and their families, we have closed the doors to all inpatient units and have restricted visitation to immediate family members over the age of 12 only. Children under the age of 12 will not be permitted to enter any of the inpatient units.”

Remember, it’s not too late to get a flu shot. Find a clinic near you.

A boil water advisory has been issued for Valley Public Service Authority Water System customers:

General Manager Calvin Smith advises the customers of the water system residing on Pinegrove Road, Old Chavous Road, Bailey Drive, Sapp Drive, Divine Drive, Pepper Branch Road, Scottsville Road, C.C. Camp Road, Storm Court and a portion of Storm Branch Road that the water service has been interrupted for emergency repairs due to an unforeseen waterline break on Thursday.

Find information on what to do in a boil water emergency here.

Have we found new high-tech way to fight mosquitoes? Microsoft is testing a “smart trap” to do just that:

A smart trap for mosquitoes? A new high-tech version is promising to catch the bloodsuckers while letting friendlier insects escape – and even record the exact weather conditions when different species emerge to bite.

Whether it really could improve public health is still to be determined. But when the robotic traps were pilot-tested around Houston last summer, they accurately captured particular mosquito species – those capable of spreading the Zika virus and certain other diseases – that health officials wanted to track, researchers reported Thursday.

It’s Random Acts of Kindness Day! Use this “kindness generator” for ideas on doing something great!

 

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Dr. Dixon Named DHEC BOL Director

Dr. Robert Brent Dixon was recently named DHEC’s new director of the Bureau of Laboratories (BOL).

“I am honored to continue serving the state of South Carolina here at DHEC,” Dr. Dixon said of his recent promotion. “This agency is filled with tremendously talented individuals whose singular goal is to make each of our communities healthier, and I enjoy working in the collaborative atmosphere.”

Dr. Dixon earned a doctorate in analytical chemistry from North Carolina State University. He studied mass spectrometry techniques for the identification and quantitation of small molecules, biomarkers, and proteins from biological specimens.  He conducted post-doctoral research at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington.

Dr. Dixon also has a Master of Science degree in Health Sciences from the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, where he studied clinical management and leadership.  Dr. Dixon is a fellow of the National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry and is board certified by the American Board of Bioanalysis and the National Registry of Certified Chemists.  His interests include emerging biomarkers, clinical mass spectrometry and improving the quality of care through laboratory medicine.

Dr. Dixon is a member of the American Association for Clinical Chemistry and the Association of Public Health Laboratories. He is also a College of American Pathologists   (CAP) laboratory inspector.

Since joining DHEC in 2016 as the deputy director of the BOL, he has worked with the laboratory team on validation of new testing platforms, reviewing the quality assurance plan and collaborating with the Newborn Screening Program.  In his former position, Dr. Dixon was technical director at PCLS in Rock Hill, a CLIA clinical laboratory accredited by the CAP.

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Morning News: Heart Health Screenings, Fighting Flu and Vitamin D

DHEC is partnering with the Heart2Heart Foundation on Statewide Screening Day for heart disease risks, including an event in the Upstate:

Heart health evaluations and risk assessments are free to Upstate residents 18 years of age and older.

People can receive a comprehensive screenings  from 7 to 9 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 16 at the Bon Secours Wellness Arena, or The Well.

Dr. Teresa Foo shared the latest about widespread flu cases across the country and in South Carolina:

Doctors with the Department Of Health and Environmental Control describe this year’s flu season as unpredictable and they say the best protection is to get a flu shot.

More than 2,700 cases have been reported statewide since October. During flu season this time last year, there weren’t nearly as many cases, with more than 4,000 reported statewide.

Speaking of flu, a new study finds that Vitamin D may help fortify you against respiratory ailments:

It’s long been known that vitamin D helps protect our bones, but the question of whether taking vitamin D supplements helps guard immunity has been more controversial. An analysis published Wednesday suggests the sunshine vitamin can help reduce the risk of respiratory infections, including colds and flu — especially among people who don’t get enough of the vitamin from diet or exposure to sunlight.

Walkable Communities: A Statewide Snapshot of Pedestrian Planning Efforts

By Kelly Kavanugh, MPH, CHES
Active Living Consultant
Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity

In 2015, the U.S. Surgeon General released a Call to Action to promote walking and walkable communities as a means to address the growing obesity epidemic in America. DHEC’s Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity (DNPAO) is working to address the Surgeon General’s recommendations in South Carolina by encouraging communities to consider pedestrians in planning efforts.What is a pedestrian plan?

A pedestrian plan includes design recommendations that create a safe, healthy, and efficient environment for pedestrian commuting and recreation.

Image by Taylor Jacobs via Attribution Engine. Licensed under CC0.


Why pedestrian plans?

Communities that have a pedestrian or bicycle/pedestrian plan demonstrate purposeful insight to accommodate for pedestrians, which better positions the communities to apply for implementation and infrastructure funding. Pedestrian plans also provide a vision for the community and demonstrate community buy-in and sustainability.

What did we do?

In order to develop more walkable communities, DNPAO needed to first determine the number of pedestrian plans that currently exist across the state. Working with John M. Newman Planning, all SC jurisdictions (46 counties and 270 municipalities) were surveyed on their pedestrian planning efforts. Sixty-two percent of jurisdictions (35 counties and 161 municipalities) responded to the survey. Key findings indicate that of those jurisdictions which responded to the survey:

  • 7% have adopted a pedestrian or bicycle/pedestrian plan
  • 6% of counties and 11.2% of municipalities are currently developing a pedestrian plan
  • 2% of jurisdictions intend to develop a pedestrian plan within the next five years
  • 9% of adopted plans include access to healthy foods

Now what?

The information gathered from this survey will provide DHEC and other agencies such as the South Carolina Department of Transportation, the Metropolitan Planning Organizations, the Councils of Governments, the S.C. Association of Counties, and the Municipal Association of S.C. a snapshot of county and municipal pedestrian planning efforts across the state. The inventory data will help to identify current and future pedestrian planning needs of S.C. communities so that more thoughtful technical assistance can be provided.

How can other DHEC program areas use this information?

  • DHEC Region community health teams can use the information to determine the different stages of pedestrian planning within their communities.
  • TheDivision of Healthy Aging can assist local jurisdictions that are creating infrastructure for pedestrians with implementing the Walk With Ease Program.
  • The Bureau of Air Quality can work with communities who have adopted a pedestrian plan to consider other programs to improve air quality and quality of life in general.
  • The Division of Injury and Violence Prevention can help to identify areas that could benefit from a pedestrian plan based on previous Safe Routes to School transportation safety observations. The Division can also help new communities who may be seeking to develop pedestrian plans by helping to address safety concerns.
  • The Office of Community Health Improvement can help new communities who may be seeking to develop a pedestrian plan by identifying opportunities for coordination and integration.

To access the snapshots, please see the links below.

Statewide: http://www.scdhec.gov/library/CR-011747.pdf

County: http://www.scdhec.gov/library/CR-011843.pdf

Municipality: http://www.scdhec.gov/library/CR-011844.pdf