Monthly Archives: June 2019

Use the Farmers and Roadside Market App This Summer for Local Fresh Produce Purchases at 356 Markets and Stands

Summer is in full swing.  Now is the time to take advantage of our state’s fresh produce by using the S.C. Farmers and Roadside Market App.  The web-based app shows the location, hours of operation and accepted payment types for hundreds of statewide farmers markets and roadside produce stands.

Payment types may include:  cash, credit cards, WIC, SNAP, and senior vouchers.

Approximately 356 markets and stands are on the app statewide.  In addition to giving locations and hours of markets and stands, the app also provides healthy recipes featuring in-season produce each month.

“The app makes it easy to find local, affordable options for fresh produce, which can empower families to make healthier food choices,” said Nick Davidson, DHEC interim director of Public Health.

Seasonal programs are also making local produce more affordable in various parts of the state.  DHEC’s WIC Farmers Market Nutrition Program provides WIC participants with checks that can be used to buy approved fresh produce at authorized farmers markets and roadside stands.

To use the S.C. Farmers and Roadside Market App, visit www.scdhec.gov/farmersmarkets.  For more information about WIC Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program, visit www.scdhec.gov/Health/WIC/FarmersMarkets/.

South Carolina Health at a Glance: Leading Causes of Death and Hospitalizations

Released in 2018, the assessment analyzes major health statistics to address health concerns and uncover possible outcomes. Because the document is approximately 346 pages, we will summarize key points in upcoming blog posts.  So far we have given an overview of the report and covered South Carolina demographics.

The next installment of the 2018 Live Healthy State Health Assessment summary covers the leading causes of death and hospitalizations for South Carolina residents.

Why is finding this information important?

Monitoring types of hospitalizations provides information about health conditions that affect our state.  Programs can be created and implemented to reduce the prevalence of certain preventable causes of hospitalization.  Leading causes of death describe the health profile of a population, which sets priorities for health policy makers and evaluates the impact of preventive programs.  Lastly, by examining premature mortality rates, resources can be targeted toward strategies that will extend years of life.  Many of the causes of death are considered avoidable or preventable.

Top 5 Causes of Hospitalizations in South Carolina in 2016

  • Circulatory System Disease (which includes heart disease and stroke) – 85,725 people
  • Births and Pregnancy Complications – 57,467 people
  • Digestive System Disease – 47,435 people
  • Respiratory System Disease – 45,201 people
  • Injury and Poisoning – 41,390 people

Leading Causes of Death in South Carolina in 2016

  • Cancer – 10,349 people
  • Heart Disease – 10,183 people
  • Unintentional Injuries – 2,998 people
  • Chronic Lower Respiratory Disease – 2,873 people
  • Stroke – 2,627 people
  • Alzheimer’s Disease – 2,481 people
  • Diabetes Mellitus – 1,369 people
  • Kidney Disease – 902 people
  • Septicemia – 871 people
  • Suicide – 818 people

Potential Life Lost_SC Health Assessment

Premature deaths are described as deaths that occur before a person reaches the expected age of 75 years.  Years of potential life lost (YPLL) is a cumulative measure based on the average years a person would have lived if they had not died prematurely.

For more details about the leading causes of death and hospitalization in South Carolina, view the report.

Hello Summer: 5 Ways to Have the Healthiest Summer Yet

Summer is officially here!  Here are a few tips to kick start the season with your health as a main priority.

  • Stay hydrated. Substitute water for sugary beverages.
  • Eat a healthy diet. Summer’s ripe fruits and veggies make any meal tasty and healthy.
  • If you smoke, quit. Smoking may limit your lung capacity and is a precursor for cancer among other health complications. Need support quitting? Call 1-800-QUIT-NOW (1-800-784-8669).
  • Get Active. Take advantage of the warm weather by taking a stroll at the park or ramp up your routine by signing up for a 5K race.  Swimming is also a great way to beat the heat and get some exercise.
  • Fight the sun with sunscreen. Protect yourself from exposure of sun rays and reduce your risk of sunburn and skin cancer.
  • Add insect repellent to your daily routine. Mosquitoes and ticks can carry diseases and spread viruses that can make you sick.

Enjoy the longer days, summer vacations, and backyard barbecues, but always be mindful of your health!

Last Day to Register for The Evidence Academy: Reducing Health Disparities in Our State, Held June 21

Join the South Carolina Cancer Alliance on Friday, June 21 from 9:30 AM to 3:00 PM for “Evidence Academy:  Reducing Health Disparities in Our State,” a FREE workshop for health care professionals and advocates.  The premise of the event is to discuss health disparities in cancer.  While mortality rates have declined for many cancers in South Carolina, significant racial disparities persist.

The event will be held at the South Carolina Hospital Association, 1000 Center Point Road, where attendees will learn how to:

  • Relate to the environment of underserved communities
  • Understand four major factors essential to self-development
  • Practice self-reflection and self-awareness
  • Understand bias, implicit bias, and privilege
  • Understand the collateral consequences of structural inequality.

Speakers include:  Scott E. Porter, MD, MBA, FACS, FAOA and Brian Chad Starks, PhD.  Dr. Porter currently serves as the Vice President of Equity and Inclusion and is the former Residency Program Director in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Prisma Health – Upstate.  Dr. Starks is a nationally recognized expert on Cultural Competency, Diversity and Inclusion, Equity and the disruption of Implicit Bias.

Registration is FREE and lunch will be provided.  To register or for more information, visit www.sccancer.org or call 803.708.4732.

5 Fast Facts About Sickle Cell Disease on World Sickle Cell Day

Today is World Sickle Cell Day.  Sickle cell disease affects millions of people worldwide and is particularly common among people originating from sub-Saharan Africa, Saudi Arabia, India, South America and Central America, and Mediterranean countries, such as Turkey, Greece, and Italy.

  1. Sickle cell disease is a group of inherited red blood cell disorders. The red blood cells become hard and sticky and look like a C-shaped farm tool called a “sickle” and the cells die early, which causes a constant storage of red blood cells. Healthy red blood cells are round and move through small blood vessels to carry oxygen to all parts of the body.
  2. SCD affects approximately 100,000 Americans and occurs in about 1 out of every 365 African-American births.
  3. To get SCD, the trait must be inherited from both parents who already have the SCD trait. People with the trait usually do not have any of the signs of the disease and live a normal life, but they can pass the trait to their children.
  4. SCD is diagnosed with a simple blood test. It is most often found at birth during routine newborn screening tests.  Early diagnosis and treatment are important.
  5. The only cure for SCD is a bone marrow or stem cell transplant. These transplants are very risky, and can have serious side effects, including death.  For the transplant to work, the bone marrow must be a close match (usually a brother or sister).

sickle-cell-checklist-rect

The Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC)’s Sickle Cell Program helps people who have SCD pay for medical services, supplies, equipment and medications.  To learn more about the program visit:  https://www.scdhec.gov/health/child-teen-health/services-children-special-health-care-needs/18-and-older-sickle-cell.