South Carolina Health at a Glance: Leading Causes of Death and Hospitalizations

Released in 2018, the assessment analyzes major health statistics to address health concerns and uncover possible outcomes. Because the document is approximately 346 pages, we will summarize key points in upcoming blog posts.  So far we have given an overview of the report and covered South Carolina demographics.

The next installment of the 2018 Live Healthy State Health Assessment summary covers the leading causes of death and hospitalizations for South Carolina residents.

Why is finding this information important?

Monitoring types of hospitalizations provides information about health conditions that affect our state.  Programs can be created and implemented to reduce the prevalence of certain preventable causes of hospitalization.  Leading causes of death describe the health profile of a population, which sets priorities for health policy makers and evaluates the impact of preventive programs.  Lastly, by examining premature mortality rates, resources can be targeted toward strategies that will extend years of life.  Many of the causes of death are considered avoidable or preventable.

Top 5 Causes of Hospitalizations in South Carolina in 2016

  • Circulatory System Disease (which includes heart disease and stroke) – 85,725 people
  • Births and Pregnancy Complications – 57,467 people
  • Digestive System Disease – 47,435 people
  • Respiratory System Disease – 45,201 people
  • Injury and Poisoning – 41,390 people

Leading Causes of Death in South Carolina in 2016

  • Cancer – 10,349 people
  • Heart Disease – 10,183 people
  • Unintentional Injuries – 2,998 people
  • Chronic Lower Respiratory Disease – 2,873 people
  • Stroke – 2,627 people
  • Alzheimer’s Disease – 2,481 people
  • Diabetes Mellitus – 1,369 people
  • Kidney Disease – 902 people
  • Septicemia – 871 people
  • Suicide – 818 people

Potential Life Lost_SC Health Assessment

Premature deaths are described as deaths that occur before a person reaches the expected age of 75 years.  Years of potential life lost (YPLL) is a cumulative measure based on the average years a person would have lived if they had not died prematurely.

For more details about the leading causes of death and hospitalization in South Carolina, view the report.

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