Category Archives: Emergency Preparedness

From Other Blogs: Vaccination and cancer, ALS, Winter Olympics & more

A collection of health and environmental posts from other governmental blogs.

Vaccination Nation: A Real Shot at Preventing Cancer

Suppose someone tells you there are quick, easy ways to help keep people from getting some kinds of cancer. Would you believe it?

Luckily, you can. You already know vaccines stop you from getting dangerous diseases from bacteria and viruses. You don’t even realize you have some viruses because they may not cause any symptoms. But a few of them can lead to cancer if left untreated. — From The Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) The Topic Is Cancer blog

National ALS Biorepository – A Component of the National ALS Registry

The National ALS Biorepository is a component of the National ALS Registry that will increase the number of biological samples from persons with ALS available for research.  These samples, along with the extensive epidemiologic data collected by the National ALS Registry, are a valuable resource in the fight to identify the causes of ALS. — From the CDC’s Your Health — Your Environment blog

Traveling to South Korea for the Olympics? Bring Back Great Memories, Not a Pest or Disease

The Winter Olympics begin shortly in South Korea, bringing us two weeks of incredible athletic performances. While many of us will watch the games from our TVs, computers or phones, some lucky individuals will travel to witness the games in person. And when traveling, people often bring back items as souvenirs or as gifts for those of us at home. If you are traveling to the Olympics (or anywhere outside the country), keep in mind there are rules about agricultural products being brought into the U.S. — From the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) blog

USDA Agencies Band Together to Assist Producers Impacted by 2017 Hurricanes

Just as families, friends and communities came together to respond to damages that occurred during the hurricanes of 2017, so did government agencies.

When hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria made landfall, the Farm Service Agency (FSA), Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), Risk Management Agency (RMA), Rural Development (RD), and Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) worked together, along with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and other intergovernmental groups, to provide information and recovery resources to agricultural producers who experienced losses. — From the USDA blog

From Other Blogs: Super Bowl leftovers, health and safety tips for mass gatherings, cancer

A collection of health and environmental posts from other governmental blogs.

End Game Strategies for Super Bowl Leftovers

The game is over and your team WON, or maybe not. But two things remain after the game — friendly rivalries and lots of leftovers. There are some important rules you need to follow regarding Super Bowl Party leftovers to ensure your loved ones don’t get foodborne illnesses after the game. — From the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) blog

Four Health and Safety Tips for Mass Gatherings

There is strength in numbers – both in public health and in public safety. The more people who take action to protect themselves, the better prepared a community is for an emergency.

Communities take different forms. At a mass gathering like the Super Bowl, the Olympics, or in a public place like the airport, the community includes people you do not know, but whose actions could help prevent a catastrophe or save your life. Here are four things you can do to prepare yourself and protect others when traveling to, and attending, a mass gathering event. — From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) The Topic Is Cancer blog

Inspiring and Taking Action Against Cancer

World Cancer Day, observed annually on February 4th, raises awareness about cancer worldwide. For me, it is a time to look back on how far we’ve come in lowering the number of cancer cases and deaths. Today, it’s just as important to set our sights on a future where every person has the right information, makes healthy choices that prevent cancer before it starts, has the right screening at the right time, and gets good cancer treatment no matter where they live. — From the CDC’s Public Health Matters blog

Cervical health awareness

According to the American Cancer Society, each year in the U.S. nearly 13,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer, and more than 4,000 die as a result. But cervical cancer is a preventable and treatable cancer, thanks to improved screening and vaccination.

Jennifer Risinger, MD, Parkridge OB/GYN, encourages all women to stay up-to-date on their Pap smears. “Cervical cancer is a completely preventable disease. Women can dramatically reduce their risk of getting cervical cancer and dying from cervical cancer by having Pap smears.” — From Flourish, Palmetto Health’s blog

DHEC’s Jamie Blair Graduates From FEMA Executive Academy

JamieBlair-FEMA

Jamie received his certificate from Katie Fox, Acting Deputy Administrator, Protection and National Preparedness, Federal Emergency Management Agency, U.S. Department of Homeland Security at the graduation ceremony Dec. 7, 2017.

DHEC‘s Jamie Blair graduated from the Federal Emergency Management Agency‘s National Emergency Management Executive Academy at the Emergency Management Institute in Emmitsburg, MD, after he completed the full curriculum that supports the advancement of the emergency management profession at strategic policy and executive leadership levels.

Collaboration and training

Jamie completed the four resident courses in the Executive Academy to include: E0680 Systems Thinking and Research Methods for Executives; E0682 Executive Emergency Management Leader Core Competencies I; E0684 Executive Emergency Management Leader Core Competencies II; E0686 Executive Emergency Management Leader Core Competencies III; and a collaborative capstone project. The Executive Academy instills emergency management leaders with a deeper understanding of contemporary and emerging emergency management issues, debates, and public policy.  It provides insights, theories, tools and resources that enable decision-makers to think and act more strategically and to build capacity to protect against, prepare for, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all types of disasters.

The Executive Academy provides the opportunity to work collaboratively, share smart practices, and participate in exercises with other senior leaders facing similar challenges.  FEMA’s National Emergency Management Executive Academy is for senior executives at the pinnacle of their careers. It’s the final phase of FEMA’s Emergency Management Professional Program (EMPP).

Three separate training programs

The EMPP curriculum is designed to provide a lifetime of learning for emergency managers and includes three separate, but closely related, training programs. Those training programs include the National Emergency Management Basic Academy, a specialized and technical training program to develop specific skill sets; the National Emergency Management Advanced Academy, a program to develop the next generation of emergency management leaders who are trained in advanced concepts and issues, advanced leadership and management,  critical thinking, and problem solving; and, the National Emergency Management Executive Academy, a program designed to challenge and enhance the talents of emergency management senior executives through critical thinking, visionary strategic planning, negotiation, and conflict resolution applied to complex real-world problems.

For more information on FEMA’s training classes through the Basic, Advanced, and Executive Academies, or other emergency management courses, go to training.fema.gov/empp.

This guide can help you prepare for severe winter weather

The official start of winter — December 21 — is not that far away. Are you and your family prepared for cold temperatures and winter storms?

After all, South Carolina isn’t immune to severe winter weather. That’s a fact that’s pointed out in the South Carolina Severe Weather Guide produced by the South Carolina Emergency Management Division and the State Emergency Response Team.

The guide offers important information to help you prepare for winter weather. It provides tips on what you should know about snow and ice, what steps to take before, during and after a storm, emergency information, winter check lists and more.

Winter storms and cold weather can be hazardous. Be sure you are prepared.

Click here to download the Severe Winter Weather Guide.

DHEC in the News: Lake Busbee, West Nile, Hurricane Hugo

Here’s a look at health and environmental news from around South Carolina.

 Santee Cooper says it won’t maintain Lake Busbee much longer, even with its uncertain fate

Conway, S.C. (WPDE) — People in Conway, and across the area, are concerned about the future of Lake Busbee.

Some Conway residents said during a meeting on Monday that Santee Cooper needs to do something about the hazards recently reported by the South Carolina Department of Environmental and Control (DHEC).

But, Santee Cooper spokesperson Susan Mungo says the company never agreed to address those issues if someone like the City of Conway was to take control of the man-made lake.

11 cases of West Nile in SC, 1 death in Upstate, DHEC says

GREENVILLE, S.C. — The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) has confirmed eleven human cases of West Nile virus in South Carolina so far this year.

One of the eleven, an individual in Anderson County, died last month. The other human cases were in Beaufort, Greenville, Horry, Richland, Union, and York counties.

General Interest

Lessons learned from Hurricane Hugo 28 years ago still help with today’s storm preparations

As Hurricane Irma wreaked havoc in the Caribbean earlier this month, Keri Wilson kept a close eye on her Folly Beach neighbors.

“When it comes to hurricanes, I don’t mess around,” she said. “I lived through Hugo, but most of my neighbors weren’t here then and some of them weren’t even born yet.”

Thursday marks the 28th anniversary of Hurricane Hugo, which slammed into the South Carolina coast as a Category 4 hurricane overnight on Sept. 21, 1989.