Category Archives: Health Regulation

DHEC Recognizes National Parents’ Day at Long-Term Care Facilities

DHEC Recognizes National Parents’ Day at Long-Term Care Facilities

Sunday, July 26, 2020, is National Parents’ Day and DHEC celebrates the wonderful relationships of families who have elderly parents residing in licensed long-term care facilities throughout South Carolina, including our 194 nursing homes and 497 assisted living facilities. This observance is a poignant tribute to the parents, grandparents, and even great-grandparents residing at these facilities who are heavily affected by the pandemic. These residents are at high risk for contracting COVID-19 and therefore visitation restrictions are still in full effect for nursing homes and assisted living facilities, with the exception of end-of-life situations. These necessary infection control measures have hindered physical social visits from family members in a time where human connection matters more than ever.

A resident at Bishop Gadsden Health Care Center in Charleston, SC using a tablet to teleconference with her daughter and grandchildren.

“Nat Turner said it best when he said that good communication is the bridge between confusion and clarity,” states JoMonica Taylor, Interim Section Manager for Residential Facilities Oversight in Healthcare Quality. “This is why DHEC works with facilities and the families of residents in making sure that we can all create innovative ways to let communication happen, like window visits and utilizing technology. As we navigate through our new norm, it is vital for all of the elderly parents in facilities to keep in contact with families in any way possible, especially since many of them might not fully be cognizant of the pandemic or why their families aren’t coming over anymore. Nothing can replace physical touch or presence, but picking up the phone or scheduling a closed window visit shows them that they have not been forgotten and that their families love them.  It gives them a ray of hope that better days are on the horizon.”

A resident at Brightwater Assisted Living in Myrtle Beach, SC having a closed window visit with her daughter, son-in-law, grandchild, and great-grandchild.

Having an elderly parent reside at a facility can be a daunting decision for any family to consider making, especially when responding to a public health threat of this magnitude. Arnold Alier, EMS Division Director in Healthcare Quality, knows this personally. “My father, up until last year, had lived in multiple nursing homes and assisted living facilities for about ten years,” said Arnold. “The experience has given me the opportunity to help other families going through the same process with a loved one, even now facing COVID-19 lockdowns and safety measures.”

Alier goes on to express how, “After taking care of Papi at home for three years, it reached the point where he needed around the clock oversight that I could not provide. It was an extremely difficult decision and there are no manuals or courses that can prepare you, so I empathize and know all too well how terrifying the decision is; how terrifying the unknown is when your sick parent is involved.” Luis Alfredo Alier, Sr., father of Arnold Alier, sadly passed away last year after a long battle with Lewy Body Dementia. Alier recalls several occasions where the long-term care facilities where his father was residing in would be on lockdown for several weeks at a time, either due to hurricanes or being at the height of flu season; lockdowns with physical restrictions similar to what many families are now facing with the ongoing state of emergency due to COVID-19.

Luis Alfredo Alier, Sr. and his son, Arnold Alier, at the Easley Retirement Center in Easley, SC.

Alier not only faced the challenge of not being able to physically visit his father when a facility was on lockdown, but he also could not make a phone call due to his father’s severe hearing problems. Video teleconferencing became Luis Alfredo, Sr.’s lifeline to his son. Arnold gives thanks and is indebted to the amazing nursing home and assisted living facility staff members throughout the years who worked with him in ensuring that he could always find some creative way to communicate with his father, working around his father’s disabilities instead of disregarding them. Seeing the face of a loved one, even if it’s simply through a tablet or computer screen, can be the different between loneliness and hopefulness. Alier had to watch his elderly parent go through a terrible battle with a relentless disease, and yet he knew that the love he carried for his father would always be evident no matter what medium he reached out to him through.

Amazing connections are formed between all families that have parents residing at these facilities. “I formed close ties with the relatives of other residents and Papi’s caregivers at these facilities,” states Alier. “We would even check in on each other’s parents as much as we could. The power of communication is incredible. In many ways, we all became a larger family. I saw how the staff would bring Papi a coffee and a banana, his favorite snack, whenever he was feeling down. How a Spanish-speaking staff member would always go out of there way to have genuine discussions with him in his native language. I remember all of it. Connections with elderly parents can happen and be maintained no matter what crazy circumstances are occurring. I’m so grateful that these facilities know that patient care goes beyond meeting a resident’s basic medical needs.”

A resident at Greer Rehabilitation and Healthcare Center in Greer, SC celebrates his 77th birthday with family members and his favorite frappuccino.

Facilities and families are coming together these days to not only create new ways that they can spend quality time with parents in the age of COVID, but also develop non-physical social gathering events that will further enrich their parents’ lives. South Atlantic Health Care’s Capstone Nursing Home in Easley, SC has integrated virtual games and stimulating group activities through the use of tablets in their social event calendar in order to ensure that residents can still chat and play with one another without having to constantly be in the same room.

The Place at Pepper Hill in Aiken, SC is an example of a nursing home that only has one closed window available for visits. Its staff have not only worked tirelessly to schedule appointments, but they have also designated it the “Family Connection Window” and have decorated it accordingly.  NHC Healthcare in Greenwood, SC gives family members the option to visit closed windows at their elderly parents’ room and use the front entrance of the nursing home, which contains a row of glass doors and windows, to conduct large closed window visits, as well. The nursing home even encourages residents to write loving messages to their loved ones on the outside glass of the entrance, as visible in the picture below. Little moments of joy and little flares of loveliness add up. The benefits that these visits are having is invaluable.

Residents at The Place at Pepper Hill in Aiken, SC speak to their children through the “Family Connection Window.”

The front entrance of NHC Healthcare in Greenwood, SC allows a resident to receive a large closed window visit from his children and grandchildren.

Shirley Klee, Activity Director at Brightwater Assisted Living in Myrtle Beach, SC, is overwhelmed with gratitude for the creative problem solving of her staff. “I am blessed to have a team of Life Enrichment Leaders that have really moved the needle keeping our residents and their loved ones connected,” states Shirley. “We have used Skype, Facetime, and closed window visits. We use them every day! We have been moved to tears many times watching these families connect and seeing their emotion. These are certainly difficult times, but we are grateful for technology. I just could not imagine such a time as this without the means to keep families together.”

A resident at Brightwater Assisted Living in Myrtle Beach, SC is visited by her daughter and sister.

Sarah Tipton, President and CEO of Bishop Gadsden Health Care Center in Charleston, SC, states that, “While residents and families may not be able to be physically together, it has been wonderful to be able to facilitate virtual connections. These visits have been so special, even emotional, for not only the family and residents, but for our team members as well. We very much feel like we are a part of the families’ lives and empathize with them in these challenging times.”

A resident at Bishop Gadsden Health Care Center in Charleston, SC video chats with her newborn great-grandchild that she has yet to meet.

We celebrate Parents’ Day by acknowledging how our own parents have impacted our lives and how vital communication is to a healthy life. DHEC continues to communicate with these nursing homes and assisted living facilities to ensure that infection control and prevention practices are being implemented correctly, but also that the quality of life for residents remains an ongoing discussion of significant importance.

While visitation remains restricted, DHEC is allowing nursing homes and assisted living facilities to choose to offer Closed Window Visits to residents and their loved ones. DHEC’s Closed Window Visit FAQs for Nursing Homes and Assisted Living Facilities has more information for facilities, residents, and visitors to learn more about this opportunity.

DHEC also supports the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ (CMS) COVID-19 Communicative Technology grant opportunity that provides federal funding so nursing homes can purchase virtual communication devices for their residents. More information regarding the COVID-19 grant opportunity for nursing homes is available here.

Families can find more information in DHEC’s FAQs for Nursing Homes and Assisted Living Facilities and by visiting both of our COVID-19 Nursing Homes and Healthcare Facilities pages for current guidance, memos, and relevant publications.

A resident at NHC Healthcare in Greenwood, SC holds a picture frame showing her graduation photo from nursing school while receiving a closed window visit from her granddaughter, dressed in her cap and gown, on her very own graduation day.

Parents’ Day is a wonderful opportunity to schedule a closed window visit, teleconference, or phone call with a parent residing at a long-term care facility.

We celebrate the families determined to work with both loved ones and facilities in order to come up with creative solutions that keep parents connected with their children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren. We celebrate the facility staff that create ingenious forms of communication and engagement to keep families connected, and who recognize that treatment of care goes beyond the physical. We celebrate the strength and perseverance of the love between a parent and child, and how love can lead to invention.

DHEC Observes National Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month

June is Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month, and DHEC recognizes the vital work that healthcare facilities, healthcare professionals, and caregivers do in providing treatment and improving the quality of life of those afflicted with brain trauma and disorders. There are currently over 95,000 people living with Alzheimer’s disease and other related dementias (ADRD) in South Carolina. According to the South Carolina Alzheimer’s Disease Registry, 25% of the ADRD population in the state resides in a long-term care facility (LTCF), including nursing homes and assisted living facilities, while the remaining 75% live independently or with loved ones in the community.

It comes as no surprise that COVID-19 has been an unexpected hurdle in providing special care to each resident or patient afflicted with these diseases. The risk for persons with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias poses a unique challenge for caregivers, families, and facilities. Changes to routines, use of unfamiliar personal protective equipment (PPE), and disruption to daily schedules can lead to fear and anxiety resulting in increased depression and worsening behavioral changes, such as agitation, aggression, and wandering. While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends specific guidance to facilities for infection control and prevention, it also recommends keeping environments and routines as consistent as possible for patients and residents suffering from ADRD and other brain disorders.

As facilities and caregivers continue to care for patients and residents, the following tips can help improve brain health for those afflicted with these diseases while preventing the spread of COVID-19:

  • Maintain the same environments and routines for the patients or residents while introducing frequent hand washing, social distancing, and use of cloth face coverings (if tolerated).
  • Introduce virtual games and activities for enrichment and memory care.
  • Use face coverings wisely. Face coverings should not be used for anyone with breathing issues or who is unconscious, incapacitated, or unable to remove the mask without assistance.
  • Keep staff consistent in memory care units at facilities.
  • Structured activities may need to occur in the resident’s or patient’s room, or be scheduled at staggered times throughout the day in order to maintain social distancing.
  • Provide safe ways to remain active, such as staff going on walks around the unit or outside with the patient or resident.
  • Limit the number of people in common areas while practicing social distancing.
  • Frequently clean often-touched surfaces, especially hallways and common areas.

Those suffering from ADRD may not be able to communicate that they are feeling ill. It is important to be informed and able to recognize symptoms in order to protect our most vulnerable from COVID-19. Early signs to recognize for a patient or resident who cannot communicate their symptoms are cough, shortness of breath, difficulty breathing, fatigue, or vomiting. Emergency warning signs are trouble breathing, new confusion, inability to wake or stay awake, and bluish lips or face.

Family and friends that would still like to visit loved ones in facilities are encouraged to use messaging systems such as emails, phone calls, cards and letters, recorded video messages, care packages, and even song and poem dedications through the facility intercom. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS)’s Civil Monetary Penalty (CMP) Reinvestment Program is a great funding opportunity for facilities wishing to procure technical equipment for communication purposes. Nursing homes can also benefit from applying to CMS’ COVID-19 Communicative Technology grant that provides funding for residents to communicate with loved ones.

Lexington Medical Center (LMC) Extended Care recently took advantage of this COVID-19 grant opportunity and purchased two iPads and three iN2L tablets for the nursing home. Though the facility encourages families to make phone calls and chat with loved one outside of the facility’s windows, the technology procured through the grant allows more residents the opportunity to connect with loved ones and to do is in the most convenient, readily accessible, and intimate way. The facility already averages 700 calls per month, not including the calls made by residents with their personal devices. The use of the virtual technology for tele-videos, texts, calls, games, and a myriad of other activities connects loved ones together and helps augment the quality of life for these residents, especially those most vulnerable to brain dysfunction and memory loss.

“Without this COVID-19 communicative grant funding and the opportunity for communities to purchase needed devices, our residents might not have the opportunity to see their family nor would their family see them, which could be detrimental to everyone,” states Debbie Bouknight, Lexington’s Life Enrichment Director. “It is both heartwarming and sometimes heartwrenching, but so worth it to see the interactions happen. I feel we would see far more decline in our residents’ physical and emotional well-being if they did not have these video visit opportunities.

More ideas of how you can connect with loved ones during COVID-19 are available here.

DHEC would like to express its gratitude to all facility staff and loved ones keeping our Alzheimer’s and other dementias population healthy during COVID-19. Residents and patients suffering from these diseases are not just physically vulnerable during this pandemic, but they are also highly susceptible to mental anguish and confusion due to the necessary changes being made at facilities for infection control and prevention. We recognize the extraordinary cooperation between facility staff and families in ensuring excellent care for the quality of life of those afflicted with ADRD, as well as adapting to new forms of communication that keep loved ones both connected and safe.

Links

CDC – Considerations for Memory Care Units in Long-term Care Facilities

CDC – Supporting Your Loved One in a Long-Term Care Facility

USC, Arnold School of Public Health – Alzheimer’s Disease Registry

South Carolina Alzheimer’s Disease Report 2019: Annual Report

Alzheimer’s Association Facts Video

DHEC Recognizes National Nursing Assistants’ Week

In observance of the 43rd National Nursing Assistants’ Week 2020, DHEC would like to recognize and thank all of South Carolina’s nursing assistants for their hard work and dedication, especially during COVID-19. During the week of June 18-24, we celebrate nursing assistants and all they do for the community. The compassionate care nursing assistants demonstrate is essential to the well-being of our loved ones in nursing homes, hospitals, and other settings.

What Are Nursing Assistants?

Nursing assistants, or certified nurse aide (CNAs), ) are crucial for the successful operations of nursing homes and other long-term care settings; they provide nearly 80-90% of the direct patient care. Nursing assistants also work in hospitals, as well as in correctional institutions, hospice programs, and home care. Working under a licensed nurse’s supervision, a nursing assistant will provide basic care to patients or residents, often involving extensive daily contact. In order to become certified as a nursing assistant or nurse aide, one must successfully complete a state-approved training program and examination, , and be added to the state registry, which in South Carolina is maintained through the South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS).

Duties of a nursing assistant:

  • Taking vital signs of patients
  • Listening to patients’ health concerns, record information, report information to nurses
  • Helping the patients dress
  • Bathing and cleaning patients
  • Serving meals to patients and helping them eat

It would come as no surprise that the extent of contact nursing assistants have with patients result in friendships; there is no limit to their commitment to the happiness and well-being of their patients.   

COVID-19

“During National Nursing Assistants’ Week, we should be mindful that what has historically been a difficult job, has become a true exercise in selflessness,” said Matt McCollum, Administrator for Ridgeway Manor Healthcare Center. “As we navigate through the changes that COVID-19 has brought upon our industry, our CNAs have been put in a position that they’ve not been tasked with before.”

During COVID-19, nursing assistants have shown great flexibility to the changes needed to keep patients and residents safe. Not only have South Carolina’s nursing assistants adapted well and continued to perform at high standards, but they have also taken on new challenges as routines and activities have come to a halt. Nursing assistants have creatively managed to keep residents active and in touch with loved ones and friends, while still following safe distancing measures and precautions.

 “These ladies and gentlemen have always done what is often a thankless job with compassion and care in their hearts, but now they are literally putting themselves in a position of potential jeopardy to provide that care to the most vulnerable Americans among us,” states McCollum. “They are truly the unsung heroes of this pandemic and no amount of thanks will ever be enough to express how blessed we all are to have them as our allies during these trying times.”

Join DHEC in thanking a CNA during the week of June 18-24. To all of South Carolina’s nursing assistants, we thank you and appreciate everything you have done for our loved ones. You are truly heroes!

Find Healthcare Services with DHEC’s “Find a Facility” Interactive Map

The start of a new year brings New Year’s resolutions, many of which are related to improving our health. Let DHEC help you find the healthcare facilities that can assist you with your resolutions by using our Find a Facility interactive map.

Accessible on any Internet-connected device, Find a Facility is an interactive map identifying all DHEC-licensed healthcare facilities. The map allows users to search for specific facilities or filter facility types based on the user’s preferences.

Licensed healthcare facilities available in the map:

  • Adult Day Care Facilities
  • Ambulatory Surgical Facilities
  • Birthing Centers
  • Body Piercing Facilities
  • Community Residential Care Facilities
  • Hearing Aid Specialists (permanent and temporary)
  • Home Health Agencies
  • Hospice Facilities and Programs
  • Hospitals
  • Intermediate Care Facilities (15-bed and +16-bed building types)
  • In-Home Care Providers
  • PSAD Facilities (inpatient and outpatient types)
  • Licensed Midwives
  • Midwife Apprentices
  • Nursing Homes
  • Renal Dialysis Facilities
  • Residential Treatment Facilities for Children and Adolescents
  • Tattoo Facilities

“This application is designed to help individuals conduct their own research on healthcare facilities and services,” said Gwendolyn Thompson, interim deputy director of Health Regulation. “Whether seeking a licensed tattoo facility or trying to find an in-home care provider, this map makes it easy to find important information all in one place.”

Clicking a pin on the zoomable map opens a detailed window for an individual facility that provides the following information:

  • Facility name
  • Facility physical address
  • Facility phone number
  • Facility administrator’s name and direct phone number
  • Facility email address (multiple, if applicable)
  • Facility license number and expiration date
  • County and ownership type of facility
  • Facility mailing address
  • Facility licensee name, if different than facility name
  • Licensed room capacities, if applicable, including:
    • Certified number of operation rooms
    • Certified number of endoscopy rooms
    • Certified number of procedure rooms
  • Regulation(s) that the facility complies with

Find a Facility is a public-use, interactive map and database, developed as a result of joint efforts between DHEC’s Health Regulations and GIS teams.

“This free application allows us to share our resources with the community at large,” said Veronica Moore, GIS program manager. “We encourage healthcare facilities, medical professionals and the general public to take advantage of the application and the valuable data it offers.”

DHEC In the News: Flu season is here, Sand mine permits, Dispose of Vaping Devices

Here’s a look at health and environmental news around South Carolina.

Is it too early to be thinking about flu season? The CDC says no

COLUMBIA, S.C. (WLTX.com) It may still feel like summer outside, but the seasons will change in a few weeks. Influenza viruses circulate all year, but flu activity usually begins to pick up in October and peaks between December and February, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

DHEC considering sand mine permit in Cottageville

WALTERBORO, S.C. (The Press and Standard) A proposal to establish a sand mine in the Cottageville area will be the topic of a South Caroline Department of Health and Environmental Control public hearing next month. The public hearing on Nov. 14 at 6 p.m. in the cafeteria of Cottageville Elementary School, 648 Peirce Rd., will give residents an opportunity to voice their comments and views about MC Dirt Co. LLC of Summerville’s permit application.

Want to Get Rid of Vaping Devices? Now You Can Hand Them Over to the Feds

SACRAMENTO, C.A. (The Sacramento Bee) People throughout the Southeast can hand over their vaping devices as an “emerging public health threat” looms, federal officials say. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration announced its Charlotte District Office was teaming up with local officials to accept vaping devices and cartridges at sites across the region on Saturday.

DHEC continues to monitor and update confirmed and probable cases of severe pulmonary disease related to e-cigarette use or vaping.