Category Archives: Uncategorized

Food Recall Alert: King Arthur Flour Recall Due to E.coli

Approximately 14,218 cases of 5 lb. Unbleached All-Purpose Flour has been recalled due to the potential presence of Escherichia coli bacteria (E. coli).  No illnesses have been reported to date.

Only the following codes and Best Used by Dates are affected by the recall.

BEST USED BY 12/07/19   LOT:   L18A07C
BEST USED BY 12/08/19   LOTS: L18A08A, L18A08B
BEST USED BY 12/14/19   LOTS: L18A14A, L18A14B, L18A14C

King Arthur Recall 2

Consumers who have any of these affected products should not consume them and should throw them away or return them to the place of purchase for credit or refund.

E.coli are bacteria found in the environment, foods, and intestines of people and animals.  Although most strains are harmless, some strains can make you sick.  E.coli may cause diarrhea, urinary tract infections, respiratory illness and pneumonia, and other illnesses.

As a reminder, please wash your hands, work surfaces, and utensils thoroughly after contact with raw dough products or flour, and to never eat raw dough or batter. For more information about risks of consuming raw dough, refer to the following: https://www.cdc.gov/features/norawdough/index.html.

Read more about the recall here.

South Carolina Health at a Glance: 2018 Live Healthy State Health Assessment Report Demographics

The first and award-winning South Carolina State Health Assessment  was released in 2018 as a snapshot of South Carolina’s health indicators, issues, and potential outcomes.  Because the document is pretty lengthy (approximately 346 pages to be exact), we will tackle each section at a glance and summarize the most pertinent information.  Our first blog post introduced general information about the assessment, including contributors, definitions of indicators, issues, and possible outcomes, and why the assessment is important.

What is the demographic makeup of South Carolina?

South Carolina’s population is growing consistently.  The state population has increased from 4.6 million in 2010 to about 5 million in 2017, an increase of 8.6% compared to an overall 5.5% increase in the United States.  In 2016, there were 4,961,119 residents in South Carolina.  The five most populated counties in the state were:

  • Greenville (482,191)
  • Richland (401,743)
  • Charleston (380,673)
  • Horry (300,418)
  • Spartanburg (294,229)

Men made up 48.5% of the population, while women were 51.5%.

Why is South Carolina’s population increasing?

The state’s growth is attributable to three main drivers:

  • People within the country moving to South Carolina (67% increase)
  • More births to South Carolina residents (23% increase)
  • People outside of the United States moving to the state (10% increase)

Another factor can be attributed to the growing elderly community.  The proportion of South Carolinians who are over 65 years old increased from 13.7% in 2010 to 16.7% in 2017.

Race/Ethnicity Makeup of South Carolina

The three largest racial/ethnic groups in South Carolina in 2016 were non-Hispanic Whites (3.1 million), non-Hispanic Blacks (1.3 million) and Hispanic/Latino (272,791).  Of the Hispanic/Latino residents, 55.3% were of Mexican origin, 12% were from Puerto Rico, 5.2% from Guatemala, and 5.0% Honduras.

Marital Status

In 2016, nearly half of South Carolina residents – 15 years old and older, were married (46.2%); 32.7% of residents had never been married; 11.1% were divorced; 7.0% were widowed; and 3.0% were separated.  The median age of first marriage was 29.9 years for men and 28.4 years for women.

Education Factors

From 2002 to 2017, the percentage of South Carolina students who graduated from high school increased from 77.3% in 2002 to 84.6% in 2017.  In 2017, the South Carolina graduation rate was the highest it had been in 17 years.

In nationwide comparison, South Carolina fairs well in educational attainment among adults.  See below.

SC Education_SCHA Report

Income Levels

The median income for individuals varied based on the level of education obtained.  As the level of education increased so did the median earnings.  Individuals with a bachelor’s degree in South Carolina had median earnings of $46,083, compared to $51,676 for the United States.  Median household income for South Carolina in 2016 was $48,501, compared to $57,617 for the United States.

SC Income_SCHA Report

Approximately 735,960 individuals (15.3%) lived below the federal poverty level (FPL).  The 2018 FPL for individuals is $12,140 and for a family of four is $25,100.  More than one-third of South Carolinians lived under 200% of the FPL (35.4%).  This is higher than the percent of United States residents.

Housing

In 2016, 68.6% of homes in South Carolina were owner-occupied, while 31.4% were renter-occupied.  The median rent was $841.  The highest median rent was seen in Beaufort County at $1,170.  Most homeowners paid between $1,000-$1,499 or $500-$999 on monthly owner costs.  Selected monthly owner costs were calculated from the sum of payment for mortgages, real estate taxes, various insurances, utilities, fuels, mobile home costs, and condominium fees.  The median South Carolina homeowner spent $1,182 on selected monthly owner costs.

South Carolina is a diverse and growing population.  For more demographics, including disability status, languages spoken at home, and veteran status, view the full report.

Now Accepting Nominations for DHEC’s Community Star Award, Deadline August 1st

Do you know an organization (or someone) who is committed to going above and beyond environmental requirements to build better community relationships, promote environmental sustainability and improve the quality of life for communities?  Nominate them!

Community Star winners are awarded in three categories:  business star, collaborative star, and rising star.  You can either be nominated or self-apply.  Complete the nomination form before August 1, 2019.

For more information about the selection process and benefits of being a DHEC Community Star, visit https://www.scdhec.gov/environment/community-star or contact Rebecca Sproles, Office of Environmental Affairs, at sprolemr@dhec.sc.gov.  Read more about last year’s winners here.

DHEC In the News: Obtaining Burn Permits, First SC Green Ribbon School Award & Swim Advisories

Here’s a look at health and environmental news around South Carolina.

Jasper County Fire-Rescue reminds residents to get burn permits

 

RIDGELAND, S.C. (Bluffton Today) Jasper County Fire-Rescue said in May it has responded to more than 380 calls for service. Crews also responded to seven brush fires, with JCFR saying six were preventable.  JCFR advises residents that anytime you decide to burn, the State Precautions Law requires anyone not within city or town limits to obtain a burn permit from the South Carolina Forestry Commission before lighting the fire.

 

First South Carolina School honored as U.S. Department of Education Green Ribbon School for Environmental Initiatives

COLUMBIA, S.C. (MidlandsBiz.com) Dutch Fork Elementary School in Lexington County is the first South Carolina school to be recognized nationally by the U.S. Department of Education for environmentally conscious programming.  The S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC), in a partnership with the S.C. Department of Education, the S.C. Energy Office and a variety of state and local partners, nominated Dutch Fork Elementary School to be recognized as a U.S. Department of Education Green Ribbon School (ED-GRS).

 

DHEC urges people to avoid swimming at this section of Myrtle Beach due to high bacteria levels

 

MYRTLE BEACH, S.C. (Fox Carolina) The advisory is for water at the public access point at 17th Avenue South in North Myrtle Beach.  DHEC said bacteria levels that are above state and federal standards were detected in the water, and swimming is not advised in the area until bacteria levels return to normal.

Check on Your Health During Men’s Health Month

(GIF Credit:  https://giphy.com/gifs/bai-13pIc0znlY5WAE)

Men, when was the last time you went to the doctor for a check up?  Men’s Health Month is a time for awareness of preventable health problems and early detection for men and boys.  Sure, physical activity and good nutrition habits are key components for a healthy lifestyle, but other factors are also important.

Here are a few tips to make healthy choices this month:

  • Start a men’s exercise group. Whether it’s basketball, tag football, or power walking, there is strength in numbers.  Call a buddy and get moving!
  • Make this month the month to receive your annual check up (and stick with it every year).
  • Use this month to learn about hereditary health issues. Do chronic illnesses such as diabetes, hypertension, or heart disease run in your family?
  • If you are over 55 years old, get screened for prostate cancer.
  • Know the signs and symptoms of a heart attack.
  • Your mental health is just as important as physical. Reduce stress where possible.  Recognize the signs of anxiety and depression and seek help.

According to the 2018 South Carolina Health Assessment:

  • The prevalence of male South Carolina smokers (23.4%) was higher compared to women smokers (17.9%).
  • In 2016, 73.5 per 100,000 males were living with hepatitis C compared to 44.2 per 100,000 females.
  • The suicide rate in South Carolina during 2016 was higher in males (24.6 per 100,000) than females (7.6 per 100,000), a more than three-fold difference (Figure 8.12)
  • The death rate resulting from falls for persons 65 years and older in South Carolina during 2016 was higher in males (55.8 per 100,000) than women (42.3 per 100,000).
  • Deaths from drug overdoses were higher in males (22.9 deaths per 100,000) compared to women (13.3 deaths per 100,000).
  • Deaths related to opioids were almost twice as high in males (16.6 per 100,000) than in women (9.3 per 100,000).

Always remember that if something doesn’t feel right, go to the doctor.  Many illnesses can be treated if given immediate attention.  Make your health a priority this month.