Tag Archives: cervical cancer

South Carolina Health at a Glance: Chronic Disease and Risk Factors (Part 3)

Our next installment of the 2018 Live Healthy State Health Assessment summaries covers chronic disease and risk factors.  Because this section lists many chronic diseases that affect South Carolina, we will summarize in three sections. In our first section we summarized South Carolina findings on obesity, prediabetes, diabetes, hypertension, arthritis, heart disease, and stroke. The next section summarized physical activity, nutrition, and cigarette smoking.  Our last section will cover all cancers in South Carolina. Check out our previous posts:  overview of the reportSouth Carolina demographicsleading causes of death and hospitalizationcross-cutting, access to healthcare, and maternal and infant health.

In the United States, cancer remains a leading cause of death, second only to heart disease. In South Carolina, cancer has surpassed heart disease in recent years as the leading cause of death. South Carolina ranks 32nd in the nation for new cases of cancer, however ranks 14th for deaths due to cancer.  Approximately 50% to 75% of cancer deaths are caused by three preventable lifestyle factors: tobacco use, poor nutrition, and lack of exercise.

SC Cancer_Assessment

  • In 2016, 10,349 South Carolina residents died from cancer.
  • Cancer of the lung and bronchus contributed to the largest number of deaths for residents of South Carolina in 2016.
  • From 2006 to 2015 in South Carolina, the rate of new cases of cancer decreased from a high of 486.8 per 100,000 in 2006 to a low of 452.8 per 100,000 in 2015.
  • The counties in South Carolina with the highest rates of new cancers during 2011 to 2015 combined were Chester, Dorchester, Lee, Sumter, and Union.

SC Cancer by County_Assessment

Lung Cancer

  • While South Carolina ranks 32nd in the United States for new cases of all cancers combined, lung cancer poses a challenge in that South Carolina ranks 16th in comparison.
  • Lung cancer was the second leading cause of new cases of cancer in 2015. It was the leading cause of cancer deaths in 2016, claiming the lives of 2,701 South Carolina residents.
  • South Carolina’s rate of new cases of lung cancer decreased from a high of 74.4 per 100,000 population in 2006 to a low of 64.5 per 100,000 population in 2015.

In our last section about South Carolina’s chronic diseases and risk factors, we will summarize information about all cancers. For more detailed information about chronic diseases and risk factors that affect our state, visit https://www.livehealthysc.com/uploads/1/2/2/3/122303641/chronic_disease_and_risk_factors_sc_sha.pdf.

Female Breast Cancer

  • In South Carolina during 2016, 75.4% of women aged 50 to 74 years old, reported receiving a mammogram within the last two years.
  • In 2015 there was a total of 4,077 new cases of breast cancer, and of these, 1,306 were diagnosed as late-stage in South Carolina representing a rate of 42.9 per 100,000.
  • South Carolina had a higher breast cancer death rate than the United States in 2016.

Cervical Cancer

  • South Carolina ranks in the lowest quartile nationally for adolescents having received one or more doses of the HPV vaccine.
  • In 2016, 79.4% of women 21 to 65 years old reported having a Pap smear within the past three years.
  • Black women are diagnosed at a higher rate than White women in South Carolina (22% higher).

Colorectal Cancer

  • In 2015, there were 2,320 new cases of invasive colon and rectum cancer in South Carolina. South Carolina met the Healthy People 2020 goal of 39.9 new cases of colorectal cancer per 100,000 population.
  • More women (71.4%) received the recommended colorectal screening than men (66.5%) in 2016.
  • Non-Hispanic Blacks (45.8 cases per 100,000 population) had a higher rate of new cases of colorectal cancer compared to non-Hispanic Whites (38.1 cases per 100,000 population) in 2015.

Prostate Cancer

  • In 2016, 43.7% of men ages 40 years and older reported receiving a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test within the past two years.
  • There were 3,521 new cases of prostate cancer in 2015 in South Carolina.
  • Non-Hispanic Black males (173.4 cases per 100,000)) had a higher rate of new cases of prostate cancer than non-Hispanic White males (97.8 cases per 100,000) in 2015.

For more information about South Carolina cancer statistics, read the full Chronic Disease and Risk Factors chapter of the 2018 State Health Assessment.

Nearly 92% of Cancers Caused by HPV Could Be Prevented by Vaccine, CDC says

According to a new study published in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, an average of 43,999 HPV-associated cancers were reported nationwide each year from 2012-2016.  Among the estimated 34,800 cancers most likely caused by HPV, 92 percent can be attributed to the HPV types that are included in the HPV vaccine and could have been prevented if HPV vaccine recommendations were followed.

HPV, also known as human papillomavirus, is a common virus that can lead to six types of cancers later in life. HPV infections are so common that nearly all men and women will get at least one type of HPV at some point in their lives.

CDC recommends all boys and girls get two doses of the HPV vaccine at ages 11 or 12. Children who get the first dose before their 15th birthday only need two doses. Children who get the first dose on or after their 15th birthday need three doses. The HPV vaccine is recommended for young adults up to age 26 if they didn’t get the vaccine as a teen.

According to the 2018 SC Health Assessment , South Carolina ranks in the lowest quartile nationally for adolescents having received one or more doses of the HPV vaccine. Talk to your child’s health care provider about getting the three recommended preteen vaccines, Tdap, HPV and meningitis vaccines.  DHEC’s public health clinics also offer all teen vaccines.

For more information about CDC’s findings, visit  cdc.gov/media/releases/2019/p0822-cancer-prevented-vaccine.html. To make your child an appointment at DHEC to receive the HPV vaccine and other recommended vaccines, visit https://scdhec.gov/health/health-public-health-clinics.

DHEC in the News: HPV, flu, critical need for more emergency medical professionals

Here’s a look at health and environmental news from around South Carolina.

This virus causes 31,500 cancers annually but few complete the vaccine to prevent it

Vaccination rates against HPV remain low in South Carolina, according to the national Blue Cross Blue Shield association, despite a wide acceptance by doctors as a key in preventing cervical and other types of cancer.

Gardasil had been administered in three doses until 2016, when the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended two doses of the same vaccine for adolescents. The Blue Cross study examined the percentage of children who got the first dose by the time they were 10 and the percentage who had gotten the final dose three years later.

Urgent care chain expanding as flu cases spike

As flu cases and related deaths continue to increase in South Carolina ahead of the peak flu season, urgent care facilities like American Family Care are rapidly expanding and opening more clinics in the Upstate.

American Family Care opened its newest location on Friday in Boiling Springs to help meet the surge in patients dealing with the flu or flu-like symptoms.

Fire chief: Critical need for medic professionals in York Co.

YORK COUNTY, S.C. — A local fire chief is speaking out about the lack of medical resources in the area.

City of York Fire Chief Domenic Manera tells NBC Charlotte his firefighters are also licensed EMTs, because the closest hospital is more than 20 minutes away. …

Chief Manera says there is a critical need for medic professionals in the western York County.

From Other Blogs: Super Bowl leftovers, health and safety tips for mass gatherings, cancer

A collection of health and environmental posts from other governmental blogs.

End Game Strategies for Super Bowl Leftovers

The game is over and your team WON, or maybe not. But two things remain after the game — friendly rivalries and lots of leftovers. There are some important rules you need to follow regarding Super Bowl Party leftovers to ensure your loved ones don’t get foodborne illnesses after the game. — From the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) blog

Four Health and Safety Tips for Mass Gatherings

There is strength in numbers – both in public health and in public safety. The more people who take action to protect themselves, the better prepared a community is for an emergency.

Communities take different forms. At a mass gathering like the Super Bowl, the Olympics, or in a public place like the airport, the community includes people you do not know, but whose actions could help prevent a catastrophe or save your life. Here are four things you can do to prepare yourself and protect others when traveling to, and attending, a mass gathering event. — From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) The Topic Is Cancer blog

Inspiring and Taking Action Against Cancer

World Cancer Day, observed annually on February 4th, raises awareness about cancer worldwide. For me, it is a time to look back on how far we’ve come in lowering the number of cancer cases and deaths. Today, it’s just as important to set our sights on a future where every person has the right information, makes healthy choices that prevent cancer before it starts, has the right screening at the right time, and gets good cancer treatment no matter where they live. — From the CDC’s Public Health Matters blog

Cervical health awareness

According to the American Cancer Society, each year in the U.S. nearly 13,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer, and more than 4,000 die as a result. But cervical cancer is a preventable and treatable cancer, thanks to improved screening and vaccination.

Jennifer Risinger, MD, Parkridge OB/GYN, encourages all women to stay up-to-date on their Pap smears. “Cervical cancer is a completely preventable disease. Women can dramatically reduce their risk of getting cervical cancer and dying from cervical cancer by having Pap smears.” — From Flourish, Palmetto Health’s blog

From Other Blogs: Impacts of smoking on women, opioid crisis, cervical cancer screening & more

A collection of health and environmental posts from other governmental blogs.

Impacts of smoking on women

There is abundant research about the many harms of smoking – whether it’s the dangerous chemicals, the addictive properties or the damage smoking causes to the body. The effects of smoking can have a profound impact on your health and those around you.

Here are some facts about smoking and its impact on women’s health.

— From Flourish, Palmetto Health’s blog

Opioid Crisis Affects All Americans, Rural and Urban

Every day, more than 90 Americans die after overdosing on opioids. That’s three people every hour.

As if the death rate wasn’t bad enough, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that the “economic burden” of prescription opioid misuse in the United States is $78.5 billion a year, including the costs of healthcare, lost productivity, and addiction treatment.

 From the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) blog

Get the Facts: 3 Myths about Cervical Cancer Screening

I recently attended a school reunion and was able to catch up with some former classmates. I had not seen many of them for over 10 years. Of all the conversations I had that weekend, one about cervical cancer screening has stuck in my mind. As a friend and I discussed what we do, I mentioned that most of my work in the past few years has focused on cervical cancer prevention and research. She was curious to learn more about the need for screening.

My friend told me that she had not been screened for cervical cancer since the birth of her now 10-year-old daughter. What followed was a conversation where she gave me her reasons for not getting screened. I listened and tried to shed light on the myths she believed that make it okay for her to avoid screening.

— From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) The Topic Is Cancer blog

What’s Cooking? USDA Mixing Bowl’s #2017BestNine

As 2017 has come to a close, the What’s Cooking team at USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service is joining the #2017BestNine fun – a social media trend where users share their favorite or most popular moments of the year – by taking a look back at our top-viewed recipes. From quinoa to quesadillas, we are proud to share our users’ favorite recipes.

 From the USDA blog