Tag Archives: chronic disease

Love on You Today for Chronic Disease Day

Did you know that six in ten adults in the United States have a chronic disease and four in ten adults have two or more?  Chronic diseases are defined as conditions that last one year or more and require ongoing medical attention or limit activities, daily living or both.  They include but are not limited to:

  • Heart Disease
  • Cancer
  • Lung Disease
  • Stroke
  • Alzheimer’s Disease
  • Diabetes
  • Kidney Disease

Heart disease, cancer and diabetes are the leading causes of death and disability in the United States.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), many chronic diseases are caused by a short list of risk behaviors:

Chronic Disease Day was created to raise awareness and increase adoption of self-care best practices to encourage prevention and reduce risk.  Use today to kickstart a healthier lifestyle.  Here are some tips for better self-care:

  • Reduce stress and anxiety.
  • Eat a balanced diet.
  • Get moving. Start slow and go at your own pace.
  • Schedule your routine checkups.
  • Drink plenty of water.
  • Build a positive support system.

Priority 2 of the South Carolina State Health Improvement Plan is detailed with ways community partners plan to promote healthy lifestyles and environments that prevent chronic conditions. A glance at our state’s current chronic disease statistics can be found in the 2018 South Carolina Health Assessment, where the assessment analyzes obesity, prediabetes, diabetes, hypertension, nutrition, physical activity, arthritis, heart disease, stroke, cancer and smoking from 2011 to 2016.  South Carolina adults have higher rates than the national average in nearly every category of chronic disease.

Learn more self-care tips to keep avoid or improve chronic disease at https://chronicdiseaseday.org/.

What Do You Know About Arthritis? 5 Fast Facts for Arthritis Awareness Month

Most people think arthritis affects older adults, but did you know that more than half of adults with arthritis are actually younger than 65?  Arthritis affects about 1 in 4 adults in the United States.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as the population ages and obesity increases, the number of adults with arthritis is expected to increase to 78 million by 2040.

  • Arthritis is the nation’s leading cause of disability. The term is used to describe more than 100 diseases and conditions that affect joints, the tissues that surround the joint, and other connective tissue.  Arthritis is common among people with other chronic health conditions, especially obesity, diabetes, and heart disease.
  • Symptoms typically include pain, swelling and stiffness in and around one or more joints. Some forms of arthritis affect the immune system and internal organs.
  • Adults with arthritis in South Carolina has consistently increased from 2011 to 2016, still harboring above the national average (see Figure 6.13)
  • Women in South Carolina have a higher prevalence of arthritis (33.2%) than males (26.7).
  • Prevent arthritis by staying active and maintaining a healthy weight. Early diagnosis and appropriate management of the disease can help people live well without pain.  Simple movement, such as walking, is recommended for at least 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week is recommended.

Adults with Arthritis_SC Health Assessment

Take the CDC Arthritis Quiz to test your knowledge or visit https://www.cdc.gov/features/arthritisawareness/index.html to learn more about Arthritis Awareness Month.

From Other Blogs: Heart failure Symptoms, Addressing Obesity Health Disparities, When Cancer Runs in the Family

A collection of health and environmental posts from other governmental blogs.

Heart failure symptoms you shouldn’t ignore

One out of every five people over the age of 40 will develop heart failure at some point in their lifetime. Right now, around 6 million Americans have heart failure, and another 900,000 people will develop it each year. Heart failure is a big issue, so it’s important to know the facts in case it happens to you or someone you love. – From Flourish, Prisma Health’s blog

Addressing Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities in Adult Obesity and Encouraging Physical Activity this National Minority Health Month

Every person should be able to reach his or her full health potential. I’m proud of the work we do in CDC’s Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity (DNPAO) to support Americans’ journey to good health—especially among people most vulnerable to chronic disease. We protect the health of Americans at every stage of life by encouraging regular physical activity and good nutrition, helping to prevent obesity in children and adults, and addressing barriers to treating obesity in children. – From Conversations in Equity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Blog

When Cancer Runs in the Family

I remember watching her pack a footlocker and suitcase for her first year of college. As I sat there on her purple crushed velvet bedspread, I wondered how long she would be gone. My Aunt Pat was the first woman in our family to go to college, so I didn’t exactly know how this was supposed to work. All I knew was that I would really miss her while she was gone and that I definitely wanted to go to this “college” place when I grew up. – From The Topic is Cancer, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Blog

DHEC in the News: Opioid abuse, diabetes champion, student-grown gardens

Here’s a look at health and environmental news from around South Carolina.

DAODAS director: Public education on opioid abuse, targeted programs key to saving lives

A comprehensive public education campaign, targeted programming and a laser-like focus on recovery are strategies the South Carolina Department of Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Services is employing to try to prevent deaths from opioid overdoses in the state.

Newly confirmed DAODAS Director Sara Goldsby said while more people are seeking treatment for opioid abuse, the opioid crisis has not yet leveled off because the state is still seeing more overdoses and more deaths from overdoses.

HopeHealth provider named diabetes champion

FLORENCE, S.C. – HopeHealth’s Christy Evans was presented the Diabetes Champion of the Year Award on March 9 during the 16th annual Chronic Disease Prevention Symposium in Myrtle Beach.

The award, presented by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, recognizes individuals who have made “substantial advancement in improving health care systems to improve care for patients through well-defined measures” with particular attention to nationally recommended diabetes standards of care.

Pee Dee students to grow gardens

FLORENCE, S.C. — Students at a few Florence schools and churches will soon have the pleasure of eating homegrown foods as a result of design and construction grants to install raised garden beds from the city and the local chapter of Eat Smart Move More.

The schools and churches are Carver Elementary Magnet School, North Vista Elementary School and Southside Middle School, plus the preschool at Central United Methodist Church, the youth program at Cumberland United Methodist Church and John Calvin Presbyterian Church.

Award-Winning Diabetes Research

By Kate Callahan, DrPH MPH, DHEC Chronic Disease Epidemiologist

South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control was well represented at the 21st Annual Fall Diabetes Symposium in North Charleston on September 17 and 18. Staff from the Division of Chronic Disease Epidemiology contributed six of the 13 scientific posters at the symposium, and their graduate assistants were awarded first and second place in the poster competition for their impressive diabetes research.
Dana AlHasan received 1st place
Dana AlHasan received 1st place for her research that examined how the presence of different food outlets, such as fast food restaurants, contributed to the risk of diabetes.Second place Winners (2) 700w

Andrew Fogner and Charity Breneman received 2nd place for their research that evaluated trends of hospitalization rates for diabetes among individuals with additional comorbidities.

Other research that was displayed by the Chronic Disease Epidemiology staff addressed the burden of pre-diabetes among adults in South Carolina, the burden of diabetes among children in South Carolina, the impact of neighborhood-level characteristics on emergency department use among patients with diabetes, and the association between parent diabetes status and the health behaviors and outcomes of their children.

The Annual Fall Diabetes Symposium is an important, local venue that provides updates and trends in diabetes care, research, and burden that are needed to drive relevant care and research that makes an impact on diabetes in South Carolina. The Division of Chronic Disease Epidemiology staff were honored to be given the opportunity to contribute such a large amount of diabetes research to the symposium.