Tag Archives: Clemson University

‘Make Your Plate SC Grown’ for National Farm to School Month in October

By Amy Weaver, MSPH
SC Farm to Institution Director
Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity

Happy National Farm to School Month!

October was designated as National Farm to School Month by Congress in 2010 as a time to celebrate the importance of farm to school programs, which improve child nutrition, educate children on where food comes from and support the local economy.

In South Carolina, Farm to School is part of South Carolina Farm to Institution, which is a joint effort of DHEC, the S.C. Department of Agriculture, the S.C. Department of Education, and the S.C. Department of Social Services, as well as Clemson University.

South Carolina Farm to Institution encourages both children and adults to take part in celebrating National Farm to School Month. Join others across the state on October 27 and participate in Make Your Plate SC Grown. The purpose of this day is to celebrate South Carolina agriculture and support our local farms. Try a new dish or make one of your favorite recipes using South Carolina produce. However you choose to participate, share your story by registering online. Don’t forget to post a photo of your SC Plate on Facebook or Instagram with the hashtag #mycertifiedplate.

Here are some additional ways to celebrate National Farm to School Month:

  • Visit a local farmers market or roadside stand.
  • Prepare recipes using South Carolina produce.
  • Visit a local farm.
  • Start a garden and refer to the South Carolina Garden Toolkit for tips.

To learn more about National Farm to School Month and South Carolina Farm to Institution, visit the website, www.scfarmtoinstitution.com.

MakeYourPlateSCGrown

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DHEC in the News: Flu, Clemson’s solar-powered mobile health clinic, minimizing breast cancer risks

Here’s a look at health and environmental news from around South Carolina.

You should get a flu shot now, SC health officials say; here’s where you can go

As the temperature dips in York, Lancaster and Chester counties, it’s time to get a flu vaccination, say experts with the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC).

According to DHEC and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), vaccinations are recommended annually for everyone six months or older. Those who are older than 50, pregnant or have chronic medical conditions such as asthma or heart disease are at an increased risk of complications from influenza, according to DHEC.

Clemson’s mobile health clinic powered by the sun

The mission of Clemson University’s new mobile health clinic is to improve the health of the underserved community while providing a teaching experience for public health students.

But as “the world’s first 100-percent solar powered clinic,” it’s also tasked with improving the environment.

The specially designed 23-by-16-foot truck is outfitted with eight solar panels on the roof that charge the entire clinic, eliminating polluting exhaust fumes and noise, said health extension agent Logan McFall.

Healthy eating, exercise help women minimize breast cancer risks

In my role as a breast imaging physician, I am asked frequently what increases my patients’ breast cancer risk. … Although many factors are not in a woman’s control, adopting as healthy a lifestyle as possible is the common sense approach for women’s breast health.

DHEC in the News: Tire recycling, Hilton Head beaches, new treatment for heart failure

Here’s a look at health and environmental news from around South Carolina.

Homeland Park residents cheer closing of tire recycling business

Homeland Park resident Steve Allen’s wife suffers from respiratory problems. But he said she can breathe better now that the tire recycling business near their home has closed.

Dave Homesley, who also lives close to the now-defunct Viva Recycling on Abbeville Highway, says the dust, fumes and noise created by business were a “catastrophe.”

“It has been very, very, very traumatic,” Homesley said.

Viva Recycling’s facilities in Anderson County and Monck’s Corner north of Charleston both shut down a few months ago. The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control revoked the operating permits for both sites in September.

3 weeks after Irma, are Hilton Head waters safe to swim in yet?

Three weeks after Tropical Storm Irma, there’s some good news for Hilton Head Island residents and visitors.

The beaches are safe to swim in, according to water quality test results from the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control.

The department collected beach monitoring samples in the Hilton Head on Sept. 20 and the results were “satisfactory,” according to a DHEC spokesperson.

General Interest

New treatment for heart failure sought in research led by Clemson University

CLEMSON — Heart-attack damage could be repaired with stem cells and tiny “nanowires” as part of a new research project that involves all three of South Carolina’s major research universities and is backed by $1.5 million from the National Institutes of Health.

Ying Mei, an assistant professor of bioengineering at Clemson University, is leading the project.

DHEC in the News: South Carolina Adopt-a-Stream program, Reedy Falls, mosquito control grant

Here’s a look at health and environmental news from around South Carolina.

The SCAAS program, which will mirror the Georgia Adopt-a-Stream (GAAAS) program, will promote and expand existing South Carolina volunteer stream monitoring efforts by providing volunteer monitors with a website for information, a database to maintain water quality monitoring data, training classes and materials, and other useful resources. Many volunteer organizations in South Carolina have already been using the Georgia program to monitor and record water quality in the streams and rivers around the Palmetto State.

  • The City of Greenville has begun a restoration project on Reedy Falls.

The stream bank restoration project is expected to take a week. Boulders are being placed along the Reedy River bank to help prevent erosion and create a safer slope between the river and sidewalk.

The grant provides funds to purchase additional insecticides and improved spraying equipment as well as to help pay for training in effective mosquito control procedures.