Tag Archives: CO

From Other Blogs: Men’s health, carbon monoxide poisoning, the truth about juice & more

A collection of health and environmental posts from other governmental blogs.

Tips for men to protect their health

Men, you and your health go hand in hand. As a reminder to make sure you are living a healthy life, here are tips to help you protect your health and well-being.

Cecelia M. Baskett, MD, family medicine physician at Lakeview Family Medicine, said, “Unfortunately, I see men who have neglected their health and now have advanced stage of disease because they did not come in to be screened. It is beneficial to everyone’s health to see a family medicine or internist every few years at a minimum. Many times we can help you prevent long-term negative effects on your lifestyle if you come in.” — From Flourish, Palmetto Health’s blog

Carbon Monoxide (CO) Poisoning Prevention

When power outages occur after severe weather, using alternative sources of power can cause carbon monoxide (CO) to build up in a home and poison the people and animals inside.

Every year, at least 430 people die in the U. S. from accidental CO poisoning. Approximately 50,000 people in the U.S. visit the emergency department each year due to accidental CO poisoning. There are steps you can take to help protect yourself and your household from CO poisoning. — From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Your Health — Your Environment blog

Squeezing the truth out of juice

Juice. We all have our favorite, whether it’s grape, apple, orange, pineapple, tropical punch. . .the list goes on and on. Everywhere we go, we’re reminded of its evil sweetness. Just walk into any grocery store and you will find an entire side of an aisle devoted to juices of infinite variety, all of it boxed, bottled and canned in the most colorful, eye-popping and kid-appealing ways.

Thanks to industry marketing tactics, many people continue to think juice is actually a healthy drink option for their kids. — From Flourish, Palmetto Health’s blog

USDA’s Meat and Poultry Hotline Keeps You “Food Safe” in the Summer!

Whether it’s a family BBQ, camping, hiking or going to the beach, summer activities can get hot! When food is a part of those activities, keep in mind the old saying: Safety first!

USDA’s Meat and Poultry Hotline is here to help you with food safety for all your summer plans. It has been assisting Americans with all types of food safety questions and concerns since 1985. Here are just a few… — From the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) blog

5 Common Flood Insurance Myths

The National Flood Insurance Program has worked to protect the life you’ve built for the past 50 years and will continue to do so into the future.  Don’t let rumors and myths drive your decisions.

Here are the five most common myths about flood insurance. — From the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) blog

From Other Blogs: Flu, women and heart disease, carbon monoxide & more

A collection of health and environmental posts from other governmental blogs.

6 Things You Need to Know About This Flu Season

Seasonal flu activity has been intense this season. As of January 20, 2018, all 49 states in the continental United States reported widespread flu activity for three consecutive weeks. This is a first since CDC’s Influenza Division began tracking flu this way. It’s likely that flu activity will be elevated for many weeks to come. — From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Public Health Matters Blog

Women and heart disease: what every woman should know

You may be surprised to know that heart disease is the leading killer of women and is more deadly than all forms of cancer combined. In fact, approximately one woman dies from heart disease every minute. — From Flourish, Palmetto Health’s blog

When can you go back to work or school after an illness?

Staying home when you’re sick is important, but how do you know when you’re okay to venture back into the world? Katie Schill, nurse practitioner with Palmetto Health’s Mobile Clinic, offers some answers… — From Flourish

Are You Part of the Silent Epidemic?

You’ve heard of mammograms to find breast cancer and tests to find colorectal (colon) cancer. But do you know how to help prevent liver cancer?

There’s no screening test for liver cancer. But there is a screening test for hepatitis C, which is the leading cause of liver cancer. — From the CDC’s The Topic Is Cancer blog

Carbon Monoxide (CO) Poisoning Prevention

Every year, at least 430 people die in the U. S. from accidental CO poisoning. Approximately 50,000 people in the U.S. visit the emergency department each year due to accidental CO poisoning. There are steps you can take to help protect yourself and your household from CO poisoning.

CO is found in fumes produced by portable generators, stoves, lanterns, and gas ranges, or by burning charcoal and wood. CO from these sources can build up in enclosed or partially enclosed spaces. People and animals in these spaces can be poisoned and can die from breathing CO. — From the CDC’s Your Health — Your Environment Blog

Avoid Carbon Monoxide Dangers During Cold Weather

January is National Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Awareness Month and with recent temperatures becoming frigid across the state, DHEC has some helpful tips to prevent your family from becoming victims to a silent killer, carbon monoxide.

Temperatures are dropping, forcing many families to use space heaters in efforts to stay warm, but it’s these colder months that pose a threat to families.

You Can Prevent Carbon Monoxide Exposure by:

  • Having your heating system, water heater, and any other gas, oil, or coal burning appliances serviced by a qualified technician every year.
  • Installing a battery-operated or battery back-up CO detector in your home and check or replace the battery when you change the time on your clocks each spring and fall. If the detector sounds leave your home immediately and call 911.
  • Seeking prompt medical attention if you suspect CO poisoning and are feeling dizzy, light-headed, or nauseated.
  • Not using a generator, charcoal grill, camp stove, or other gasoline or charcoal-burning device inside your home, basement, or garage or near a window.
  • Not running your car or truck inside a garage attached to your house, even if you leave the door open.
  • Not burning anything in or using a stove or fireplace that isn’t vented.
  • Not heating your house with a gas oven.

Carbon monoxide (CO) is a silent killer. It is an odorless and colorless gas that can cause sudden illness and death if inhaled.

On average, nine South Carolinians die every year from carbon monoxide poisoning and these types of preventable events annually result in 243 hospitalizations and 1,713 visits to the emergency department. Annually, carbon monoxide poisonings cost the state of South Carolina about $7.5 million in hospitalizations and emergency room visits.

Hospitalizations and ED visits due to carbon monoxide poisoning have risen since 2000, by an average of 5 percent each year, which is statistically significant. Hospitalization rates due to CO poisoning have risen by 60 percent since 2000.

Sources of CO poisoning include gas-powered generators, charcoal grills, propane stoves, and charcoal briquettes for both cooking and heating indoors, motor vehicles, fire, boats, and power washers and other gas powered tools.

At-risk populations include babies and infants, the elderly, and people with chronic heart disease, anemia or respiratory illness.

To find answers to frequently asked questions about carbon monoxide or links to find additional prevention tips, please visit cdc.gov/co/guidelines.htm.

Beware Of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning During Power Outage

If your home experiences a power outage due to a hurricane, tornado or severe storm, be careful when using alternative power sources because they can cause carbon monoxide (CO) to build up and poison the people and animals inside.

CO is found in fumes produced by portable generators, stoves, lanterns, and gas ranges, or by burning charcoal and wood. CO from these sources can build up in enclosed or partially enclosed spaces. People and animals in these spaces can be poisoned and can die from breathing CO.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says CO poisoning is entirely preventable and that there are steps you can take to help protect yourself and your household from carbon monoxide poisoning.

Change the batteries in your CO detector every six months. Also, learn the symptoms of CO poisoning.

How to recognize CO poisoning

The most common symptoms of CO poisoning are headache, dizziness, weakness, nausea, vomiting, chest pain, and confusion. People who are sleeping or who have been drinking alcohol can die from CO poisoning before ever having symptoms.

CO poisoning prevention tips

  • Never leave the motor running in a vehicle parked in an enclosed or partially enclosed space, such as a garage.
  • Never run a generator, pressure washer, or any gasoline-powered engine inside a basement, garage, or other enclosed structure, even if the doors or windows are open, unless the equipment is professionally installed and vented. Keep vents and flues free of debris, especially if winds are high. Flying debris can block ventilation lines.
  • Never run a motor vehicle, generator, pressure washer, or any gasoline-powered engine less than 20 feet from an open window, door, or vent where exhaust can vent into an enclosed area.
  • Never use a charcoal grill, hibachi, lantern, or portable camping stove inside a home, tent, or camper.
  • If CO poisoning is suspected, consult a health care professional right away.

For more information, please visit the CDC’s Carbon Monoxide Poisoning website.