Tag Archives: death

From Other Blogs: Stopping type 2 diabetes, understanding gynecologic cancers, ending health disparities & more

A collection of health and environmental posts from other governmental blogs.

Putting a stop to type 2 diabetes

Did you know that diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States? It is estimated that by the year 2020, 50 percent of Americans will either have diabetes or be pre-diabetic, but there is a way to prevent this.  — From Flourish, Palmetto Health’s blog

Let’s Help Women Understand: What We Need to Know About Gynecologic Cancers

Once upon a time, women were told to get a Pap test every year. And most of us did, even though it wasn’t always clear why we were being tested. We just did what we were told and thought it was a surefire way to stay healthy. But times and recommendations have changed about what test to have, how often to have it, and the reason to have it. — From the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) The Topic Is Cancer blog

Mission Possible: A Year in Review

As a long-time scientist and physician, I’ve treated patients in a range of environments – from U.S. cities and military bases, to sub-Saharan Africa and Haiti in the aftermath of the devastating earthquake in 2010. Throughout those experiences, I saw firsthand the impact that health disparities could have on health outcomes. That’s why – even when treating single patients – it was important to always consider the social determinants of that individual’s health.

The inequity in health that we see across the world today remains one of the greatest social injustices of our time. Access to healthcare and behaviors is greatly influenced by social factors and environment, including housing, transportation, and education. As the nation’s leading public health agency, CDC plays a crucial role in promoting the practice of health equity, and I’m committed to seeing that CDC puts science into action to confront the gaps in health and the social determinants behind those inequities. — From the CDC’s Conversations in Equity blog

New HRSA Program Will Help Clinicians and Patients in the Fight Against Opioid Addiction

On December 27, 2018 HRSA launched a program that is critical to HHS’ response to the opioid crisis. This National Health Service Corps Substance Use Disorder Workforce Loan Repayment Progam will support the HHS Five-Point Opioid Strategy by increasing patient access to high-quality substance use disorder preventive, treatment, and recovery services. — From the US Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS) blog

Superfood of the Month: Cauliflower

Cauliflower is considered one of the healthiest foods on Earth and with good reason. It has a rich supply of health-promoting phytochemicals, a high level of anti-inflammatory compounds, and the ability to ward off cancer, heart disease, brain disease and weight gain. There isn’t much cauliflower can’t do. — From Lexington Medical Center’s official blog

Christmas Safety List: 12 Tips for Toys

Toys are supposed to bring joy and delight during the gift-giving season, and DHEC wants to make sure little ones stay safe.

According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, about 252,000 children were treated in U.S. emergency rooms for toy-related injuries in 2017. Here are 12 tips to make sure your family stays safe this holiday.

Make sure to follow the age recommendations for toys and games.
Always pay close attention to the age recommendations on toys and choose one according to a child’s age, interest, and skill level.

Take notice of warning and safety labels.
Be aware of other safety labels such as “Flame retardant/flame resistant” or “Washable/Hygienic materials” on dolls and other stuffed toys.

Plastic wrappings can be deadly for small children – discard them immediately.
Discard the plastic wrappings from toys immediately; they become deadly playthings to small children.

When choosing toys, keep in mind that kids under 1 like to see, touch, hear and taste.
For children 1 and under, choose toys that are colorful, lightweight, have various textures and are made of non-toxic materials. Children, this age learn through sight, touch, sound and taste and often put things into their mouths to explore them.

Small parts like removable eyes are choking hazards.
Don’t give young children any toys with small parts such as removable eyes, noses, etc., they are choking hazards.

Stay away from toys with sharp points, edges, and wires that stab, cut or shock.
Inspect all toys for sharp points or edges made from such materials as metal or glass. These toys should not be given to children under 8.

Never hang toys with strings, cords, or ribbons of any kind in cribs or playpens.
Toys with strings, cords or ribbons of any kind should not be hung in cribs or playpens. Young children can become entangled, which can cause injury or death.

Teach older children to keep toys with removable small parts or sharp points away from younger siblings.
Teach older children to keep their toys that may have removable small parts, sharp points or toys powered by electricity out of reach of younger siblings.

Worn or broken toys can cause injuries.
Keep toys and play equipment in good condition, discard any toys that are broken to prevent injuries.

Check toys regularly for safety and durability.
Regularly conduct a toy maintenance check for safety and durability.

Provide safe, hazard-free play environments both indoors and outdoors.
Supervision is essential both indoors and outdoors.

Toys can be a tripping hazard!
Teach children to put toys away when they are finished playing with them to prevent accidental falls.

To learn more about preventing your child from other injuries you can visit our website at http://www.scdhec.gov/Health/ChildTeenHealth/EarlyChildhood/PreventInjuries/.

DHEC in the News: Flu, US life expectancy

Here’s a look at health and environmental news from around South Carolina.

It’s not too late to protect yourself and others with a flu shot

With the spirit of giving resting upon us during this holiday season, there is no better public gift you can give than providing flu vaccinations for yourself and your family.

The annual flu vaccine is the single best way to protect yourself and your loved ones, and although we are already two months into the flu season, it is not too late to get vaccinated.

General Interest

Suicide, Drug Overdose Rates Bring US Life Expectancy Down

The suicide rate in the United States is at its highest in at least 50 years, and is contributing to a decrease in the nation’s life expectancy, the federal government said Thursday.

Life expectancy for the U.S. population declined to 78.6 in 2017, down from 78.7 the previous year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said in a new report.

DHEC in the News: World Aids Day, flu,WIC

Here’s a look at health and environmental news from around South Carolina.

DHEC to offer testing on World Aids Day

COLUMBIA, SC (WOLO)– World AIDS Day is Saturday, Dec. 1, 2018 and the Health officials are encouraging South Carolinians to get tested.

Second flu-related death confirmed in South Carolina this season

Columbia, SC (WLTX) – A second person has died from the flu in South Carolina during the 2018 flu season.

The victim was 65 years or older, and from the Lowcountry region, according to DHEC. The first flu-related death in the state was also recorded in the Lowcountry earlier this month.

Town of Carlisle to host WIC

CARLISLE — WIC will be in Carlisle this Wednesday and will return there each month.

In a statement released Monday, Town Administrator Shannon McBride announced that “WIC will be coming to Carlisle Town Hall on Wednesday, November 28, from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. They will also be coming here on a monthly basis.”

Tips for caregivers during National Alzheimer’s Awareness Month

It is not easy to care for a person with Alzheimer’s disease or related dementias. Frankly, it can be challenging. People with dementias might stop recognizing their caregiver or even have trouble feeding themselves, using the restroom or bathing.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias are now the sixth leading cause of death overall and the fifth leading cause of death among those over age 65. The CDC says nearly 6 million people in the United States are living with Alzheimer’s, a number predicted to nearly triple by 2060.

As the number of people with Alzheimer’s continues to increase so will the need for caregivers. And those caregivers will need guidance and resources to meet the challenge.

Tips for caregivers

With November being National Alzheimer’s Month, this is a good time to encourage caregivers and provide them with helpful tips. Here are some tips from the CDC website:

You might not be recognized. Sometimes people with Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia may forget certain people while remembering others. Try not to take it personally if you aren’t recognized.

Try to meet the person where he or she is. It’s best not to correct an Alzheimer’s patient about what year it is, where they are, or other things. This can cause agitation and reduce trust.

Routine is important. Alzheimer’s patients are usually most comfortable with what they know and are familiar with. Try to avoid major changes.

Discuss behavioral changes with the doctor. Some behaviors, such as aggression, can be related to undertreated pain, or may be side effects of various medications.

Above all, practice self-care. Your loved one needs you to be healthy to provide the best possible care.

More information and resources

The CDC provides various resources for caregivers of persons with Alzheimer’s disease or related dementias, including Dementia Dialogues — a program that began with the University of South Carolina’s Prevention Research Center.

Visit the CDC’s website for more information and resources for caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s.