Tag Archives: disaster

From Other Blogs: Hurricane season, National Safety Month, pork and swine market reports & more

A collection of health and environmental posts from other governmental blogs.

Preparing Emergency Managers for Hurricane Season

The 2017 hurricane season will be remembered for the extreme devastation it caused in Texas, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, and Florida as well as our neighbors in the Caribbean.  While long-term recovery efforts continue, plans have been readied for the  2018 hurricane season.  No one knows how the United States will be affected by hurricanes this year, so plans must be prepared with the possibility that your community will be impacted.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency with federal partners, such as the National Weather Service/National Hurricane Center and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, alongside state, county, and city emergency managers, have been working diligently to prepare for hurricane season.  This is done through training and outreach events coordinated by FEMA’s National Hurricane Program.  The program’s mission is to provide technical assistance to emergency managers and federal government partners for hurricane preparedness training, response and evacuation planning, and operational decision support. — From the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) blog

Make One Change for Safety this National Safety Month

June is National Safety Month, an opportunity to help prevent unnecessary injuries and deaths at work, on the roads, and in our homes and communities. With this year’s theme, No 1 Gets Hurt, we are encouraging readers to think of at least one change you can make to improve safety this month. This joint blog from NIOSH and the National Safety Council (NSC) highlights the weekly themes of emergency preparedness, wellness, falls and driving. Help us spread the word about National Safety Month to your family, friends and co-workers. Use the information below, download and share free materials from the NSC website, and visit the NIOSH website to help ensure that No 1 Gets Hurt. — From the CDC’s NIOSH Science blog

Knowledge is Power with New Users Guides for Pork and Swine Market Reports

The smell of pork barbeque fills the country air – must be time for the summer grilling season! Before pork makes its way into the store and onto your grill, complex transactions occur between producers, packers, retailers, and foodservice providers. To ensure market transparency, USDA’s Livestock Mandatory Reporting Program (LMR) provides the U.S. pork industry the market intelligence they need to competitively buy and sell pork.

LMR provides price and volume data covering about 97 percent of the swine industry and 87 percent of wholesale pork sales. LMR reports provide a wealth of information, but they can be complex. To help the pork industry navigate LMR and how pork is priced, USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) created three user’s guides that provide insight into understanding the information available through our market reports. – From the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) blog

5 Communication Lessons Learned from Hurricane Maria

When Category 4 Hurricane Maria made landfall in Puerto Rico, CDC assembled a team of experienced communicators who were flexible, bilingual, and culturally sensitive communicators. This group of experts prepared to deploy to Puerto Rico on short notice to support the communication needs of the Puerto Rico Health Department. I was asked to lead content development, and as a native Puerto Rican I did not hesitate to go home and help in any way I could.

I was part of the first team of four health communications specialists who arrived on the island just three weeks after the hurricane. We knew our job was not going to be easy— severe electrical power outage meant that residents had no access to internet, social media, or television. Antennas had fallen during the storm, so there was very limited radio coverage and almost no cell phone connectivity. Large billboards were literally on the ground and newspapers were not circulating widely because there was no way to publish and transport them for delivery. — From the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Public Health Matters blog

Building a Resilient Nation

My first day on the job at FEMA was the day Hurricane Maria made landfall in Puerto Rico. Since then I’ve seen firsthand the tireless efforts of FEMA’s dedicated workforce in supporting disaster survivors from Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, Maria, the catastrophic California wildfires, and dozens of other disasters around the nation.

As we moved from immediate response and recovery to long term recovery, we reflected on the lessons from the 2017 disasters. In doing so, we contemplated not only how to increase our readiness for catastrophic disasters, but also how best to reduce impacts from future disasters. We soon realized that we needed to shift the way we as a nation think about disasters, so that together, we can be better prepared in the future.

As a result of our months-long after action review, we recently released our 2018-2022 Strategic Plan. Goal 1 is to Build a Culture of Preparedness. — From the FEMA blog

Death of Bald Eagle Yields Life Lessons for West Virginia Students

Most educators agree that experiential learning makes a more lasting impression on students than classroom lectures. It’s the reason why Cindy Bryant and Greg Phillips, both teachers from Robert C. Byrd High School in Clarksburg, WV, put in the hard work to organize an overnight field trip for their students. The two educators never imagined it would be something they, and their students, would never forget.

On a cold night last November, a group of 10th grade biology students were on a bus, heading home to Clarksburg. For two days, they had hiked, observed wildlife and conducted their first stream study at Experience Learning, a center near Spruce Knob in the Monongahela National Forest. Sitting at the front of the bus, Cindy, who is also a biologist, noticed a large object in the road ahead.

As the bus got closer, she knew immediately it was a bald eagle—and it was blocking the way. Standing more than 2 ½ feet tall, the eagle did not respond when she and Greg tried to shoo it out of harm’s way. Seeing no other option, they decided to rescue it in the hopes of connecting with a wildlife rescue organization. – From the USDA blog

Hurricane season is near: Be sure to pick up a 2018 South Carolina Hurricane Guide

Hurricane season is upon us, and now is the time to get your official 2018 South Carolina Hurricane Guide.

The 2018 guide, recently released by the S.C. Emergency Management Division (SCEMD) and partner agencies, provides residents useful information about what they should do before, during and after the landfall of a major hurricane. This year’s guide has updated sections that include new evacuation zones (Dorchester County), tips on preparing for an evacuation, ways to stay connected during an emergency and steps to keep in mind when returning home after a major storm. Images and artwork from last year’s Hurricane Irma are also included.

Over the past week or so the guide has been distributed via subscription and rack sales in various newspapers across the state. Beginning June 1, it be available at all South Carolina Welcome Centers, at any Walgreens store statewide and at South Carolina Department of Motor Vehicles (SCDMV) offices in Bamberg, Beaufort, Bluffton, Charleston, Conway, Dillon, Florence, Georgetown, Kingstree, Ladson, Lake City, Little River, Mullins, Moncks Corner, Mount Pleasant, Myrtle Beach, North Charleston, Saint George and Varnville.

Governor Henry McMaster has proclaimed May 27 through June 2 to be South Carolina Hurricane Preparedness Week. South Carolina residents should act now to prepare for major emergencies like hurricanes by reviewing their family emergency plans, developing a disaster supplies kit and talking with family members about what could happen during a crisis.

The official Atlantic hurricane season runs June 1 through Nov. 30. If you live on or near the South Carolina coast it’s particularly important for you to understand and be prepared for the dangers these storms can pose.

Although we can’t prevent hurricanes, we can take steps to protect ourselves and our families. To help you prepare for the 2018 season, we encourage you to pick up or download the updated guide.

Click here to download the 2018 Hurricane Guide. For more information about hurricane and disaster preparedness, visit the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control website or go to scemd.org.

sc-hurricane-guide-2018-cover.png

DHEC in the News: New emergency manager mobile app, swimming advisory, heart disease

Here’s a look at health and environmental news from around South Carolina.

South Carolina emergency managers offer a new disaster app: #SCEMERGENCY

That sense of panic when a storm knocks out the power or you have to evacuate?

The state now has an app for that.

The new #SCEMERGENCY personal manager gives alerts during emergencies and guides users through the countless details of building a disaster kit.

It also identifies which roads to take in an evacuation and where shelters or hotels are open.

Here’s why S.C. warns against swimming along Horry County beaches

The state has issued a swimming advisory for all Horry County beaches following Tropical Storm Alberto.

The Department of Health and Environmental Control issued the warning on Tuesday evening.

“Due to the impact of the amount of rainfall associated with Tropical Storm Alberto, all beaches in Horry County have been placed under a swimming advisory,” the announcement reads.

General Interest

Dealing with heart disease: Exercise and diet

Diet and exercise are two huge factors cited by experts in addressing heart disease, both for young people looking decades ahead and for adults looking to rebound from a medical challenge.

Local teacher Tiffany Middlebrooks, who specializes in health science at Ridge Spring-Monetta Middle/High School, said prevention is a major topic in her classes.