Tag Archives: E. coli

Food Recall Alert: King Arthur Flour Recall Due to E.coli

Approximately 14,218 cases of 5 lb. Unbleached All-Purpose Flour has been recalled due to the potential presence of Escherichia coli bacteria (E. coli).  No illnesses have been reported to date.

Only the following codes and Best Used by Dates are affected by the recall.

BEST USED BY 12/07/19   LOT:   L18A07C
BEST USED BY 12/08/19   LOTS: L18A08A, L18A08B
BEST USED BY 12/14/19   LOTS: L18A14A, L18A14B, L18A14C

King Arthur Recall 2

Consumers who have any of these affected products should not consume them and should throw them away or return them to the place of purchase for credit or refund.

E.coli are bacteria found in the environment, foods, and intestines of people and animals.  Although most strains are harmless, some strains can make you sick.  E.coli may cause diarrhea, urinary tract infections, respiratory illness and pneumonia, and other illnesses.

As a reminder, please wash your hands, work surfaces, and utensils thoroughly after contact with raw dough products or flour, and to never eat raw dough or batter. For more information about risks of consuming raw dough, refer to the following: https://www.cdc.gov/features/norawdough/index.html.

Read more about the recall here.

DHEC in the News: Flu, heart health, safety of romaine lettuce

Here’s a look at health and environmental news from around South Carolina.

This flu season one of South Carolina’s deadliest in recent years

Though flu season isn’t over, this one marked one of the deadliest years for the disease in recent South Carolina history, according to the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control.

As of last week, 271 people have died across the state during the 2017-2018 flu season, passing last season by 177 people, according to Department of Health records.

 Flu season’s 271 deaths in SC were most in years

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) – Officials say this flu season in South Carolina was the deadliest in years, with over 100 deaths (more) than the previous one that had the most.

General Interest

Increasing exercise over 6-year span protects the heart

Heart failure affects about 5.7 million adults in the United States.

The most salient risk factors for this condition, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), are: hypertension, a history of coronary heart disease or heart attacks, and diabetes.

Since this condition, once acquired, has to be managed for life, healthcare professionals recommend preventive strategies.

These usually involve making more healthful lifestyle choices by acquiring good dietary habits and exercising regularly.

Romaine lettuce likely safe to eat again, CDC says

Officials with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said they believe E. coli-tainted romaine lettuce blamed for more than 170 illnesses in 32 states is likely no longer in circulation.

DHEC in the News: Cold weather tips, infant mortality, E. coli outbreak

Here’s a look at health and environmental news from around South Carolina.

Health experts offer tips during cooler weather, warn about carbon monoxide exposure

Last week brought freezing temperatures, snow and ice across South Carolina, even as far as the Palmetto State’s coastal region when a winter storm blanketed beaches and palm trees with snow and ice.

When temperatures drop in cooler months, health experts often share a familiar message to residents in families – bundle up, stay warm and indoors (when necessary) to prevent cold-related illnesses.

A good way to be prepared for cold-weather health problems includes taking a first aid and emergency resuscitation (CPR) course, as well as taking preventative action by preparing homes and cars in advance for winter emergencies, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says on cdc.gov.

Health in brief: CDC publishes updated infant mortality data, national rate shows no improvement

The rate of babies who die during their first year of birth has improved nationally in the last decade, but in recent years, improvement in this key public health metric has plateaued.

New data released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows there was no change in the national rate of infant mortality between 2014 and 2015, the most recent years for which it has published numbers.

South Carolina has a middling rate overall, compared to other states.

General Interest

CDC: E. coli outbreak could be linked to romaine lettuce

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, along with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, are investigating reports of E. coli illnesses in 13 states possibly linked to romaine lettuce or other leafy greens, according to a statement issued by the CDC.

Arizona and California produce about 90% of the lettuce and other leafy greens grown in the United States. The produce also comes from Mexico.