Tag Archives: Father’s Day

Father’s Day Is Important, Dad. Get Screened.

Dads deserve the attention, accolades and gifts they get each Father’s Day. They also should give themselves and their families a gift in return: a lifelong dedication to healthy living.

That includes adopting healthy habits that help reduce the risk of developing cancer.FathersDayicon Cancer is a complex disease. Your risk of developing cancer isn’t based only on genetics or family history, although they do play a role. Have you ever wondered how much lifestyle affects cancer risk? Research shows that half of all cancer today could be prevented by practicing healthy habits.  Start by adopting one or two healthy behaviors.

Once you’ve gotten those down, move on to others:

  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • Exercise regularly
  • Don’t smoke
  • Eat a healthy diet
  • Drink alcohol only in moderation, if at all
  • Protect yourself from the sun
  • Get screening tests

Healthy Weight & Good Nutrition. Less Cancer.

There are several research-proven ways to lower your cancer risk! One way is by maintaining a healthy weight. dadimagineNot sure how to begin? First focus on not gaining more weight, then on eating a healthier diet and exercising to achieve a healthy weight. Ask a health care provider for tips on how to achieve and maintain a healthy weight. Check out these sites for healthy recipe options:

Healthy Father’s Day Recipes

Healthy Heart & Soul Recipe Book

Healthier Recipes – USDA Mixing Bowl

More Exercise. Less Cancer.

Regular exercise – just 30 minutes each day – will lower your risk of developing cancer. Whether you’re running on a treadmill or walking around the block, it all counts. Encourage your whole family to get up and move together. Exercise is especially important for cancer survivors. For some cancers, regular physical activity may lower the risk of recurrence and eliminate the risk of other chronic diseases. Visit http://eatsmartmovemoresc.org and click on Let’s Go! for information on parks and trails, and other resources.

 Fight Cancer. Don’t Smoke.

Smoking is a leading cause of cancer and death from cancer. It causes cancers of the lung, esophagus, larynx, mouth, throat, kidney, bladder, liver, pancreas, stomach, cervix, colon, and rectum, as well as acute myeloid leukemia. Many of the chemicals found in cigarettes have been shown to cause DNA damage, including key genes that protect us against cancer. For cancer patients, studies also find that smoking hinders cancer treatment. For help with smoking, contact the SC Tobacco Quitline.

Lung Cancer

Most cases of lung cancer are caused by smoking. Lung cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer in the U.S. and the leading cause of cancer death in men and women. Three screening tests have been studied to see if they decrease the risk of dying from lung cancer: 1) Low-dose spiral CT scan (LDCT scan), 2) Chest X-ray; and 3) Sputum whitebowcytology. Screening with low-dose spiral CT scans has been shown to decrease the risk of dying from lung cancer in heavy smokers. Screening with chest X-rays and/or sputum cytology does not decrease the risk of dying from lung cancer. Talk with your doctor about the risks of lung cancer screening.

More Education. Less Cancer.

Prostate Cancer

There is no standard or routine screening test for prostate cancer. Talk with yourbluebow doctor about the digital rectal exam (DRE) and prostate-specific antigen test (PSA) for prostate cancer. The South Carolina Cancer Alliance is a resource for education trainings and opportunities. Visit their website for patient care information and volunteer opportunities.

More Screenings. Less Cancer.dadnote

It is important to remember that your doctor does not necessarily think you have cancer if he or she suggests a screening test. Screening tests are given when you have no cancer symptoms.

Colorectal Cancer

Screenings are essential to catching some cancers early and can help prevent purplebowexisting cancers from spreading. Speak with your doctor about tests to detect colorectal cancer.

Colorectal cancer is the third most common type of non-skin cancer in men (after prostate cancer and lung cancer).

Prevention. Less Cancer

Cancer prevention starts with education, screening, and a healthy lifestyle. Take control of your health, and encourage your family to do the same.

Happy Father’s Day.

Healthy fathers make Father’s Day happier

Father’s Day in the United States is always held on the third Sunday of June and people across the country take time to celebrate the contribution fathers and those who serve as father figures make daily in the lives of their children.

While fathers should enjoy the gifts and glory that come with Father’s Day, they also should give themselves and their families a gift in return: a lifelong dedication to healthy living.

Fathers, that means taking good care of yourself. Men are at a higher risk than women for many deadly health conditions and die an average of five years younger than women, so it’s important to be proactive. Eat right. Exercise regularly. Visit the doctor. Stay healthy and strong in mind and body. Maintain a healthy work-life balance. Here are a few tips to help you enjoy being the best dad you can be:

QuitSmokingFathersDay

Live tobacco free

Old habits die hard, but even worse they can get picked up by your kids who look up to you. Tobacco use increases your risk of heart disease, stroke, cancer and infertility. Whether you smoke, dip or vape, quitting tobacco today will make a difference you can feel. Call 1-800-Quit-Now or visit www.scdhec.gov/QuitForKeeps for free 24/7 help from trained Quit Coaches.

Make mental wellness a priority

Being a dad can sometimes feel like the weight of the world is on your shoulders, but you don’t need to feel like you are carrying a burden alone. Depression often goes undiagnosed in male patients and men are four times more likely to commit suicide. Visit your doctor, talk to a trusted friend and ask questions so you can get help feeling your best.

Eat well

Eating right means establishing a daily diet that includes a variety of fruits, dark green, starchy and other vegetables, whole grain breads and cereals. If you have a history of prediabetes or diabetes, limit your starches. Eat a variety of protein foods, including seafood, lean meats and poultry, eggs, legumes (beans and peas), and nuts, seeds and soy products. Stick to fat-free or low-fat dairy, limit fried dishes and skip saturated fats altogether.

Get moving

Find a new hobby or make time for your favorite one and build up your energy and your strength by doing something you love. Running, swimming, hiking, golf, soccer, fencing, tennis, paddling, walking man’s best friend or even yard work are all great ways to get outside, enjoy some fresh air and get some exercise. Make time for yourself – 30 minutes five days a week is recommended.

Stay on schedule

No one likes going to the doctor, but regular check-ups can actually help you see a doctor less by keeping you healthy before problems start. Follow suggested checkup and screening guidelines.

With proper rest, diet, exercise and other preventive health measures, men can live longer, happier lives. And that, for sure, would make for many more Happy Father’s Days to come.