Tag Archives: Fireworks

Tips for a Healthy and Safe 4th of July

 

S.C. Department of Health and Environmental wishes everyone a happy and healthy 4th of July. Here are a few tips to keep the festivities fun.

Packing the perfect cooler

  • Everyone gets thirsty on hot days. Use a separate cooler for drinks so the one containing food isn’t opened as much and can keep food at the perfect temperature.
  • When using a cooler, keep it out of the direct sun by placing it in the shade or shelter.
  • Avoid opening the lid too often, which lets cold air out and warm air in.
  • Pack raw meats, poultry, or seafood on the bottom of the cooler and wrap them in plastic. This will reduce the risk of bacteria from raw juices dripping on other foods.
  • Pack coolers until they are full. A full cooler will stay cold longer than one that is partially full.
  • Use an insulated cooler with sufficient ice or ice packs to keep the food at 40 °F or below.
  • Pack food right from the refrigerator into the cooler immediately before leaving home.
  • Only take out the meat and poultry that will immediately be placed on the grill.

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Travel like a backyard bbq pro

  • When transporting food to another location, keep it cold to minimize bacterial growth.
  • Put the cooler in an air-conditioned car not a hot trunk.
  • Bring extra plates, grilling utensils and napkins and use different platters and utensils for raw and cooked meat and poultry.
  • Keep raw meats seperate from fresh produce and ready-to-eat foods.
  • Wash hands, work area, and all utensils before, during, and after preparing food.
  • If you’re eating away from home, find out if there’s a source of clean water. If not, bring water for preparation and cleaning. Or pack clean cloths, and moist towelettes for cleaning surfaces and hands.
  • Refrigerate any leftovers promptly in shallow containers. Discard any food left out more than 2 hours (1 hour if temperatures are above 90 °F).

Firework Safety Tips

  • Leave it to the professionals. There are many great displays across state, so just sit back and enjoy the oohs and ahhs. 
  • Adults only. Never let children play with fireworks. Even sparklers, a firework often considered by many to be the ideal “safe” device for the young children, burn at very high temperatures.
  • Take a seat. If you’re setting of fireworks, don’t allow running or horseplay while lighting them.Be sure other people are standing at a safe range before lighting fireworks.
  • Set off fireworks outdoors in a clear area on a flat, solid surface so that fireworks don’t tip over or shoot into areas where there are houses, dry leaves, grass and other flammable materials.
  • Never have any portion of your body directly over a firework while lighting. Don’t look over/into a “dud.”
  • Keep a bucket of water nearby.
  • Do not try to relight or handle malfunctioning fireworks. Soak them with water and throw them away.
  • Never light fireworks in a container, especially a glass or metal container.
  • Store fireworks in a cool, dry place.Check instructions for special storage directions.
  • Keep our beaches and neighborhoods clean. Fireworks produce debris and litter. Be sure to clean up your litter by the next morning and dispose of it in a trash can.

 

 

 

 

 

Firework Safety for New Year’s Eve

By Bryony Wardell

When the clock strikes midnight, remember that it’s best to leave fireworks to the professionals.  But if you choose to use fireworks, also choose to protect yourself, your family members and your friends.

Fireworks can cause serious injuries, including burns, contusions, lacerations and eye injuries and can even be deadly.

Safety Tips!

Smart Purchasing

Please obey local and state laws regarding the sale and use of state approved fireworks.Buy only consumer-grade fireworks.  Avoid buying fireworks packaged in a brown bag, which often means they were made for professional displays and could be dangerous for consumer use.

Handle with care

Read all warning labels and follow directions on each device. Never put your head or any part of your body over a firework. Never hold a lit firework in your hand.Fireworks should not be carried in your pocket. Don’t aim or throw fireworks at another person. Store fireworks in a cool, dry place and keep a fire extinguisher of water bucket handy.

Adult supervision

Firework activities should be adult led, and adults should never allow children to handle or ignite fireworks.  Make sure you, your kids, and others watch from a safe distance.

Safe lighting

Light from the side (never standing directly over) using a blunt or handheld igniter.  Wear protective eyewear.  Remember that a dud is a dud, and you should never attempt to re-light a short fuse or a firework dud.   And, call 911 immediately if someone is injured from fireworks.

For more information on firework safety, visit www.cdc.gov/family/minutes/tips/fireworks/.

 

Safety First for Fireworks on the Fourth!

By Betsy Crick

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July 4th is just around the corner – which for many, means fun in the sun, grilling out, and a great fireworks show to end the evening.  Be safe while celebrating with friends and family this year!

Just five years ago in South Carolina, fireworks caused 182 injuries, including serious burns, contusions, and other trauma; and 177 people were treated in emergency departments, while five were admitted to a hospital.

Safety tips to remember: 

  • Never allow young children to play with or ignite fireworks and always have an adult supervise fireworks activities. Parents don’t realize that young children suffer injuries from sparklers. Sparklers burn at temperatures of about 2,000 degrees – hot enough to melt some metals.
  • Avoid buying fireworks that are packaged in brown paper because this is often a sign that the fireworks were made for professional displays and that they could pose a danger to consumers.
  • Never place any part of your body directly over a fireworks device when lighting the fuse. Back up to a safe distance immediately after lighting fireworks.
  • Never try to re-light or pick up fireworks that have not ignited fully.
  • Never carry fireworks in your pocket or shoot them off in metal or glass containers.

For more information about fireworks safety, please visit DHEC’s website.