Tag Archives: Flourish

From Other Blogs: Heart-healthy recipes, World Hearing Day, lowering your cancer risk & more

A collection of health and environmental posts from other governmental blogs.

Five tips towards a delicious heart healthy recipe

You don’t have to purchase new cookbooks to create delicious, heart healthy recipes your whole family will love. There are plenty of low-fat, low-calorie options for making your comforting family favorites more heart healthy right now. Just one or more changes can make a huge difference. — From Flourish, Palmetto Health’s blog

Five important numbers to know for heart health

Learning these five heart health numbers can help you improve and maintain your heart health. Once you know your numbers, you can talk with your doctor about how to best manage and lower your risks for heart disease. — From Flourish

World Hearing Day: March 3rd. “Hear the future … and prepare for it.”

Repeated exposure to loud noise over the years can cause hearing loss. There is no cure for hearing loss! Protect your hearing by avoiding loud noise such as concerts and sporting events. Use earplugs or noise-cancelling headphones to protect your ears. If you already have hearing loss, take steps to keep it from getting worse. — From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Your Health — Your Environment blog

Lowering Your Cancer Risk: A Matter of Ups and Downs

Think of listening to your favorite song. No matter what kind of music it is, someone was behind the scenes making it sound great: bringing out certain parts or instruments, balancing it, getting rid of background noise.

Cutting your cancer risk is a little bit like making great music. — From the CDC’s The Topic Is Cancer blog

Soil Health Practices for Mitigating Natural Disasters

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) reports that more than 25 million Americans – almost 8 percent of the population – were affected by major disasters in 2017. From severe flooding in Puerto Rico and Texas to mudslides and wildfires in California, major natural disasters in 2017 cost over $306 billion nationally. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Centers for Environmental Information, this is a new annual record. — From the US Department of Agriculture blog

From Other Blogs: Protecting children from cold weather, test your home for radon, frequent exertion and standing among US workers

A collection of health and environmental posts from other governmental blogs.

Braving the cold

As South Carolinians, we like to brag about our mild winters; however, as we saw at the start of the New Year, we can’t always predict what the weather has in store for us. Did you know young children don’t always realize when they’re cold and can lose their natural body heat quickly because of their small size? As parents, it’s important to know how to keep our little ones safe and warm when surprisingly frigid days are upon us. — From Flourish, Palmetto Health’s blog

Protect Yourself and Your Family from Radon

Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer after cigarette smoking. If you smoke and live in a home with high radon levels, you increase your risk of developing lung cancer. Having your home tested is the only effective way to determine whether you and your family are at risk of high radon exposure. — From the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Your Health — Your Environment blog

Frequent Exertion and Frequent Standing Among US Workers

Have you ever wondered if your job involves more standing, bending, or lifting than other jobs? Or if there are ways you could avoid injuries from these movements while on the job?

Last week, NIOSH published an article on frequent exertion and frequent standing among US workers by industry and occupation group. Using data from the Occupational Health Supplement (OHS) to 2015 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), the article focused on currently employed adults who were asked the following two questions related to the physical activities of their current job:

  1. “How often does your job involve repeated lifting, pushing, pulling, or bending?” (exertion)
  2. “How often does your job involve standing or walking around?” (standing). — From the CDC’s NIOSH Science Blog

From Other Blogs: Impacts of smoking on women, opioid crisis, cervical cancer screening & more

A collection of health and environmental posts from other governmental blogs.

Impacts of smoking on women

There is abundant research about the many harms of smoking – whether it’s the dangerous chemicals, the addictive properties or the damage smoking causes to the body. The effects of smoking can have a profound impact on your health and those around you.

Here are some facts about smoking and its impact on women’s health.

— From Flourish, Palmetto Health’s blog

Opioid Crisis Affects All Americans, Rural and Urban

Every day, more than 90 Americans die after overdosing on opioids. That’s three people every hour.

As if the death rate wasn’t bad enough, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that the “economic burden” of prescription opioid misuse in the United States is $78.5 billion a year, including the costs of healthcare, lost productivity, and addiction treatment.

 From the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) blog

Get the Facts: 3 Myths about Cervical Cancer Screening

I recently attended a school reunion and was able to catch up with some former classmates. I had not seen many of them for over 10 years. Of all the conversations I had that weekend, one about cervical cancer screening has stuck in my mind. As a friend and I discussed what we do, I mentioned that most of my work in the past few years has focused on cervical cancer prevention and research. She was curious to learn more about the need for screening.

My friend told me that she had not been screened for cervical cancer since the birth of her now 10-year-old daughter. What followed was a conversation where she gave me her reasons for not getting screened. I listened and tried to shed light on the myths she believed that make it okay for her to avoid screening.

— From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) The Topic Is Cancer blog

What’s Cooking? USDA Mixing Bowl’s #2017BestNine

As 2017 has come to a close, the What’s Cooking team at USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service is joining the #2017BestNine fun – a social media trend where users share their favorite or most popular moments of the year – by taking a look back at our top-viewed recipes. From quinoa to quesadillas, we are proud to share our users’ favorite recipes.

 From the USDA blog

From Other Blogs: Sustainable healthy New Year’s resolutions, colorectal cancer screening, drone technology & more

A collection of health and environmental posts from other governmental blogs.

Making sustainable changes in the new year

New year’s resolutions are upon us and instead of following the latest fad diet or workout that you’ll be over in a month’s time, try something different. This year, why not make one single change each week that is realistic and one you can stick with?

This seems, perhaps, too simple, but the results can be massive! By making small, realistic and sustainable changes you can lose double, even triple the amount of weight than you would with some 30-day challenge. How, you ask? Because you’ll stick with it! — From Flourish, Palmetto Health’s blog

The Six Steps New Hampshire Took to Get More People Screened for Colorectal Cancer

Screening at the right age can find colorectal cancer before it starts, but some people still don’t go for many reasons. A CDC-funded program in New Hampshire created a way to overcome the problems patients had getting screened. — From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) The Topic Is Cancer blog

Drone Collects Information to Benefit Great Lakes

The USDA Forest Service and Michigan Technological University (MTech) are using unmanned aerial systems, or drones, to advise the Hiawatha National Forest’s land management efforts.

Located in Michigan’s wild and scenic Upper Peninsula, the Hiawatha National Forest’s dramatic shorelines lie nestled up to Lake Superior, Huron, and Michigan – three of the five Great Lakes. — From the USDA blog

MyPlate Makes It Easier for Health Professionals to Encourage Healthier Lifestyles in 2018

The energy and excitement of beginning a new year makes January a popular time for making New Year’s resolutions. Often, two of the most popular resolutions focus on health: to get fit and to lose weight.

As health professionals know all too well, many people establish lofty goals on January 1, only to drop their resolutions by June. One reason so many struggle may be that they incorporate extreme goals that may not be realistic. A more helpful strategy could be to start with small steps and celebrate milestones along the way. As nutrition and health professionals prepare to help their clients and patients meet their New Year’s health resolutions, MyPlate, MyWins is a great place to start. Let MyPlate,MyWins be a resource to help you assist your clients in turning resolutions into real solutions for a healthy new year. — From the U.S. Department of Agriculture blog

From Other Blogs: Holiday leftovers, winter safety, food labels & more

A collection of health and environmental posts from other governmental blogs.

Holiday Leftovers? We’ve Got You Covered!

All good things must come to an end, including the holidays. But leftovers from your holiday celebrations can help stretch out y our holiday cheer. —  From the EPA Blog

Be Prepared to Stay Safe and Healthy in Winter

Winter storms and cold temperatures can be hazardous. Stay safe and healthy by planning ahead. Prepare your home and cars. Prepare for power outages and outdoor activity. Check on older adults. — From the CDC’s Your Health – Your Environment Blog

NCEH/ATSDR – Top 10 “Your Health, Your Environment” Blog Posts of 2017

As another year draws to a close, perhaps you’ve realized that you didn’t get a chance to read all of the “Your Health, Your Environment” blog posts. To help you get caught up, here are the ten most popular posts of 2017.  — From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Your Health – Your Environment blog

Both Government and Private Company Food Labels Have Tradeoffs

For more than a century, American families have used government-regulated food labels, such as “USDA prime beef,” to help them decide what food products to buy. Today, consumers also look to food labels for information about how their food was grown and how healthy it is. — From the U.S. Department of Agriculture blog

When the holidays aren’t so happy

Gifts and celebrations, parties and lights, what’s not to like? Right?

But for some, the holiday season does not always feel festive and bright.

Here are five factors that can make maintaining the holiday spirit a struggle. — From Flourish, Palmetto Health’s blog