Tag Archives: King Tides

DHEC in the News: DHEC Public Health Data App, King Tides, septic tanks

Here’s a look at health and environmental news from around South Carolina.

New DHEC site helps answer public health questions

COLUMBIA (WACH) – The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) is introducing a new, innovative web portal to help answer public health questions.

DHEC’s County Health Profiles allows users to access state and county health data and compare data sets.

Citizen scientists watch for ’king tides’

WASHINGTON — The tide watchers start patrolling whenever the celestial forces align. From coast to coast, hundreds of tide watchers come out with their cameras to record the latest “king tides,” brief episodes of tidal flooding that could become the norm, with expected sea level rise.

King tides are a colloquial term for the highest tides of the year. They occur when the moon is closest to the earth at moments when the sun, moon and Earth are in alignment, increasing the gravitational forces at play.

A decade ago, few had heard of “king tides,” much less waded through them in galoshes. Now, Miami regularly floods. So do Myrtle Beach and Charleston, South Carolina, and other U.S. cities. And more than ever, groups of citizens are out there photographing the results, uploading the photos and debating what the future will bring.

DHEC grant will fix septic systems for more than 100 in Loris, Longs

LORIS, SC (WBTW) – A new grant will help Horry County officials improve water quality in parts of the county.

The Horry Soil and Water Conservation District received the grant from the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control. The grant amounts to over $400,000 and, according to project manager Sam Ward, it will go towards fixing or replacing faulty septic systems.

New Tide Tables for the New Year

 

Ghost Crab at Sunrise

Ghost Crab at Sunrise

A new year is on the horizon, and South Carolinians who want to update their calendars with a new year of tidal information can now get the 2017 Tide Table Poster from the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC).

The Tide Table Posters are produced by DHEC’s Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management (OCRM) to help citizens monitor and plan for tidal events along the coast. The tables provide daily tidal information based on National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) tide predictions, including dates and times of high tides with corresponding water levels, and dates and times of low tides.

Coastal Photography 

DHEC holds its Coastal Photography Contest each year to determine the featured photograph for the new Tide Table Poster and web page. Nearly 100 photos were received during the 2016 contest, and Michael Trotman was selected with his winning photo, Ghost Crab at Sunrise on Isle of Palms. Congratulations, Michael!

Where to Get Your Tide Table Poster

Limited supplies of printed Tide Tables are available at DHEC OCRM offices in Charleston, Beaufort and Myrtle Beach. A foldable, desktop version of the chart is also available online. To learn more about the Tide Tables and to download the 2017 poster, click here.

King Tides Program

king-tide-photoDHEC is leading the South Carolina King Tides initiative to document the effect that extreme tide events have on our state’s beaches, coastal waterways, private property and public infrastructure.

Through the initiative, citizen scientists can submit their photos of king tide events to help DHEC monitor and respond to coastal environmental issues. The photos are included in DHEC’s long-term analysis of coastal vulnerability and planning initiatives with municipalities.

To participate in the South Carolina King Tides Initiative, click here.

 

New Year – New Tide Tables

By Liz Hartje, DHEC Coastal Projects Manager

A new year is on the horizon, and South Carolinians who want to update their calendars with a new year of tidal information can now get the 2016 Tide Table Poster from the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC).

The Tide Table Posters are produced by DHEC’s Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management (OCRM) to help citizens monitor and plan for tidal events along the coast. The tables provide daily tidal information based on National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) tide predictions, including dates and times of high tides with corresponding water levels, and dates and times of low tides.

Impacts of tides vary, but extreme high tides may wash debris and contaminants into coastal environments or cause coastal erosion and flooding. Knowing when tides occur can help South Carolina’s coastal communities and residents prepare. Tidal information also helps residents and visitors plan for recreational activities such as kayaking, boating or a trip to the beach.

Where to Get Your Tide Table Poster

Limited supplies of printed Tide Tables are available at DHEC OCRM offices in Charleston, Beaufort and Myrtle Beach. A foldable, desktop version of the chart is also available online. To learn more about the Tide Tables and to download the 2016 poster, click here.

2016 Tide Table Download

Coastal Photography 

DHEC holds its Coastal Photography Contest each year to determine the featured photograph for the new Tide Table Poster and web page. Nearly 100 photos were received during the 2015 contest, and  Justin Morris was selected with his winning photo, Orange Crush, which was captured at Folly Beach. Congratulations, Justin!

About Tides

The rise and fall of tides are caused by the gravitational and centrifugal forces exerted by the moon, sun and the earth.  These forces produce two high tides and two low tides per day in South Carolina.

The highest seasonal tides occur when the earth, moon, and sun are aligned, and the moon is closest to the earth in its elliptical orbit, known as perigee. Often referred to as King Tides, these extreme high tides are predictable based on the known astronomical forces described above. But, it’s important to remember that meteorological conditions like onshore winds, low atmospheric pressure, and precipitation can push water inland and result in water levels that greatly exceed astronomical predictions.

MY SC King Tide Entry Murrels Inlet.jpg

King tide photo at Murrels Inlet submitted by Christopher Stout

King Tides Program

 

DHEC is leading the South Carolina King Tides initiative to document the effect that extreme tide events have on our state’s beaches, coastal waterways, private property and public infrastructure.

Through the initiative, citizen scientists can submit their photos of king tide events to help DHEC monitor and respond to coastal environmental issues. The photos are included in DHEC’s long-term analysis of coastal vulnerability and planning initiatives with municipalities.

To participate in the South Carolina King Tides Initiative, click here.

 

Highest Predicted King Tides – Coming This Fall

By Dan Burger (Coastal Services Division Director) and Liz Hartje (Coastal Projects Manager)

King-Tides-Pics

The highest predicted King Tides of 2015 are quickly approaching! At Charleston Harbor, water levels are expected to reach 7 feet and higher above Mean Lower Low Water (MLLW) at the end of September and October. These extreme high tides are predicted to occur during the peak of the Atlantic Hurricane Season. NOAA’s tide predictions are based on the astronomical tide calendar, which takes into account the gravitational pull of the moon and sun on Earth’s oceans. Keep in mind that water levels can exceed predicted heights under various meteorological conditions like onshore winds, low atmospheric pressure, and precipitation. In 2014, observed King Tide water levels often surpassed astronomical predictions at Charleston Harbor. For instance, there were over 3.5 times more King Tide days than predicted. Cumulatively, water levels were 6.6 feet MLLW or higher for tCaptureotal of 201 hours, over 5 times longer than predicted. On average, observed King Tides were 0.6 feet higher than astronomical predictions, with a maximum observed difference of nearly 2 feet above predicted levels. King Tides peaked just below 7 feet, on average, and the highest observed water level reached 7.6 feet (August 9).

 

MyCoast: South Carolina 

SCKTThe MyCoast: South Carolina King Tides Reporting Tool is revealing what King Tides look like on the South Carolina coast and how these events affect infrastructure, mobility, and our shared natural resources. Over 180 photos were submitted by MyCoast members last year, see photos from select reports below. MyCoast_Icon_CaptureVisit http://mycoast.org/sc or download the MyCoast app and start photo-documenting these extreme tide events using your smartphone!

Here’s a list of dates, times, and predicted tidal heights for this coming September and October:

 

Date Predicted Height*  (Time)
September 28 7.0 (8:29 a.m.)
September 29 7.1 (9:22 a.m.)
September 30 7.0 (10:16 a.m.)
October 26 7.0 (7:16 a.m.)
October 27 7.2 (8:10 a.m.)
October 28 7.2 (9:03 a.m.)
October 29 7.1 (9:55 a.m.)
* Feet above MLLW at Charleston Harbor Tide Station

Going Coastal

By Cassandra Harris
going_coastal

Summer is finally here, and for many of us it means heading to the coast to spend some much needed fun in the sun and surf. DHEC wants to help you stay prepared and informed this summer.

Before you take off for the shores, check out some of our latest coastal apps:

  • Beach AccessConnecting S.C. beachgoers to over 620 public access points along our coast, the Beach Access app provides visitors with key information about a location’s amenities, including parking, restrooms, handicap accessibility, showers and more.
  • MarinaMateIn addition to listing marina locations statewide, the MarinaMate app provides mariners with information on available services, including where you can access shore power hookups and dispose of on-board sewage.
  • MyCoast: South CarolinaUsed to visualize the impact of coastal hazards and to enhance awareness among decision-makers and stakeholders, MyCoast is a portal citizens can use to assist DHEC in the collection and analysis of pictures and data relating to coastal events, including King Tides and coastal storms.
  • South Carolina Beachfront Jurisdiction And Adopted Erosion RatesProviding easily accessible information to current and prospective property owners, the S.C. Beachfront Jurisdiction app offers an overview of beachfront jurisdictional lines, beach zones and adopted erosion rates on a variety of base maps. It also provides users with access to survey packets by specific beach area, which contain specific line coordinates, survey monument locations and additional background information.