Tag Archives: SC Health

South Carolina Health at a Glance: Leading Causes of Death and Hospitalizations

Released in 2018, the assessment analyzes major health statistics to address health concerns and uncover possible outcomes. Because the document is approximately 346 pages, we will summarize key points in upcoming blog posts.  So far we have given an overview of the report and covered South Carolina demographics.

The next installment of the 2018 Live Healthy State Health Assessment summary covers the leading causes of death and hospitalizations for South Carolina residents.

Why is finding this information important?

Monitoring types of hospitalizations provides information about health conditions that affect our state.  Programs can be created and implemented to reduce the prevalence of certain preventable causes of hospitalization.  Leading causes of death describe the health profile of a population, which sets priorities for health policy makers and evaluates the impact of preventive programs.  Lastly, by examining premature mortality rates, resources can be targeted toward strategies that will extend years of life.  Many of the causes of death are considered avoidable or preventable.

Top 5 Causes of Hospitalizations in South Carolina in 2016

  • Circulatory System Disease (which includes heart disease and stroke) – 85,725 people
  • Births and Pregnancy Complications – 57,467 people
  • Digestive System Disease – 47,435 people
  • Respiratory System Disease – 45,201 people
  • Injury and Poisoning – 41,390 people

Leading Causes of Death in South Carolina in 2016

  • Cancer – 10,349 people
  • Heart Disease – 10,183 people
  • Unintentional Injuries – 2,998 people
  • Chronic Lower Respiratory Disease – 2,873 people
  • Stroke – 2,627 people
  • Alzheimer’s Disease – 2,481 people
  • Diabetes Mellitus – 1,369 people
  • Kidney Disease – 902 people
  • Septicemia – 871 people
  • Suicide – 818 people

Potential Life Lost_SC Health Assessment

Premature deaths are described as deaths that occur before a person reaches the expected age of 75 years.  Years of potential life lost (YPLL) is a cumulative measure based on the average years a person would have lived if they had not died prematurely.

For more details about the leading causes of death and hospitalization in South Carolina, view the report.

South Carolina Health at a Glance: 2018 Live Healthy State Health Assessment Report

South Carolina’s first comprehensive State Health Assessment was drafted last year to create awareness about health issues and opportunities of improvement that impact the overall health of our state.  Because the report is 346 pages, we will tackle the report in upcoming blog posts and provide a brief summary of each section.

Stay tuned for more posts as we break down South Carolina’s health, page by page.

Whose idea was the South Carolina Health Assessment Report?

The Alliance for a Healthier South Carolina, a diverse group of more than 50 state and community leaders and organizations, serves as the backbone organization for Live Healthy South Carolina (LHSC). LHSC brings organizations and leaders together to assess population health outcomes, identify data-driven priorities, and recommend best practices that can be implemented at the state and local levels.   The SC Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) is among this group, providing epidemiology information as well as compiling other health data.

What exactly is the South Carolina Health Assessment Report?

The Live Healthy South Carolina State Health Assessment is a comprehensive description of the health status of South Carolinians and will be used to inform health improvement plans at the state and community levels.  It also serves as a resource for organizations that need access to health data.

Why is this report necessary?

The findings in this assessment can help ensure the opportunity for South Carolina’s health and well-being is a priority.  For everyone who lives, works, worships, and vacations in our great state, the assessment can equip us to make better health decisions as well as meet the challenges of today and tomorrow by contributing to a culture of health that values every South Carolinian.

The assessment summarizes data from the following areas:  demographics, health indicators, leading causes of death and hospitalizations, cross-cutting, access to health care, maternal and infant health, chronic disease and risk factors, infectious disease, injury, physical environment, and behavioral health.

Although this is the first state assessment, the goal is to assess state-level health risk factors and outcomes every three to five years and use the data to identify priority areas to be addressed in South Carolina.

View the comprehensive report:  https://www.livehealthysc.com/uploads/1/2/2/3/122303641/sc_sha_full_report_nov.18.pdf