Tag Archives: standing water

Flood waters and standing water can be hazardous

Hurricane Irma is still considered a dangerous storm for South Carolina, even with the current projected models showing reduced risk to the state. There is still a high risk of flooding and downed utility lines across the state.

Flood waters are nothing to play with or to take for granted. Exercise caution.

Turn Around, Don’t Drown!

No matter how harmless it might appear, avoid driving, wading or walking in flood waters. Just 6 inches of moving water can knock you down and one foot of moving water can sweep your vehicle away.

Beware of hazards below

All too often, danger lurks within and beneath flood waters and standing water.

DHEC urges everyone not to use area streams, rivers or the ocean for drinking, bathing or swimming due to the possibility of bacteria, waste water or other contaminants. Avoid wading through standing water due to the possibility of sharp objects, power lines or other hazardous debris that might be under the surface.

Follow these steps if you come into contact with flood waters or standing waters:

  • Avoid or limit direct contact.
  • Wash your hands frequently with soap, especially before drinking and eating.
  • Do not allow children to play in flood water, or play with toys contaminated with flood water.
  • Report cuts or open wounds, and report all symptoms of illness. (Keep vaccinations current.)

Visit the DHEC website for more information on Hurricane Irma, avoiding flood waters and more. In addition, visit the Environmental Protection Agency’s website for more information on avoiding contact with flood waters or the Centers for Disease Control’s page on risks associated with flood waters and standing water.

 

Flood Waters And Standing Water Can Be Hazardous

No matter how tempted you might be to wade or play in flood waters, don’t do it. Oftentimes, danger lurks within and beneath flood waters and standing water.

DHEC urges everyone not to use area streams, rivers or the ocean for drinking, bathing or swimming due to the possibility of bacteria, waste water or other contaminants. Avoid wading through standing water due to the possibility of sharp objects, power lines or other hazardous debris that might be under the surface.

Follow these steps if you come into contact with flood waters or standing waters:

  • Avoid or limit direct contact.
  • Wash your hands frequently with soap, especially before drinking and eating.
  • Do not allow children to play in flood water, or play with toys contaminated with flood water.
  • Report cuts or open wounds, and report all symptoms of illness. (Keep vaccinations current.)

Get more information on avoiding contact with flood waters from the Environmental Protection Agency’s website. Also, visit the Centers for Disease Control’s page on risks associated with flood waters and standing water.