Tag Archives: training

From Other Blogs: Eating properly for workouts, preparing for your colonoscopy, communicating about workplace safety & more

A collection of health and environmental posts from other governmental blogs.

Eat properly to workout properly

Fueling before a workout is essential in order to get the best results. A good workout allows your body to positively adapt to the training stimulus. Think better results, faster! By giving your body the proper nutrients it needs, your body will digest and turn food into useable energy. — From Flourish, Palmetto Health’s blog

9 Tips on Preparing for Your Colonoscopy

Anyone who’s had a colonoscopy screening for colorectal cancer will tell you that getting ready for one takes time and can be pretty inconvenient. But it’s very important to empty out your colon so the doctor can see even the tiniest trouble spot! — From the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) The Topic Is Cancer blog

Workplace Safety Communications Campaigns Should be Driven by Employer, Industry, Workflow, and Culture

Employees who drive for work face significant roadway risks, and motor vehicle crashes can devastate families, communities, and organizations. Crashes are the leading cause of workplace fatalities, with 1,252 deaths of vehicle drivers and passengers on public roads in 2016. In 2013, on-the-job crashes cost employers over $25 billion and led to 155,000 lost work days. Despite the human and financial costs of crashes, only 24 percent of employers offer occupational health services as part of their wellness programs. Furthermore, the available safety training does not always improve worker health outcomes. — From the CDC’s NIOSH Science Blog

Assessing Community Needs in Real-time

What if there was a way to evaluate the needs of a community after a natural disaster? Or understand a community’s attitudes and beliefs about a specific public health behavior? Enter CASPER: Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response, a tool for health departments and public health professionals to assess community needs in real-time.  — From the CDC’s Public Health Matters blog

DHEC’s Jamie Blair Graduates From FEMA Executive Academy

JamieBlair-FEMA

Jamie received his certificate from Katie Fox, Acting Deputy Administrator, Protection and National Preparedness, Federal Emergency Management Agency, U.S. Department of Homeland Security at the graduation ceremony Dec. 7, 2017.

DHEC‘s Jamie Blair graduated from the Federal Emergency Management Agency‘s National Emergency Management Executive Academy at the Emergency Management Institute in Emmitsburg, MD, after he completed the full curriculum that supports the advancement of the emergency management profession at strategic policy and executive leadership levels.

Collaboration and training

Jamie completed the four resident courses in the Executive Academy to include: E0680 Systems Thinking and Research Methods for Executives; E0682 Executive Emergency Management Leader Core Competencies I; E0684 Executive Emergency Management Leader Core Competencies II; E0686 Executive Emergency Management Leader Core Competencies III; and a collaborative capstone project. The Executive Academy instills emergency management leaders with a deeper understanding of contemporary and emerging emergency management issues, debates, and public policy.  It provides insights, theories, tools and resources that enable decision-makers to think and act more strategically and to build capacity to protect against, prepare for, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all types of disasters.

The Executive Academy provides the opportunity to work collaboratively, share smart practices, and participate in exercises with other senior leaders facing similar challenges.  FEMA’s National Emergency Management Executive Academy is for senior executives at the pinnacle of their careers. It’s the final phase of FEMA’s Emergency Management Professional Program (EMPP).

Three separate training programs

The EMPP curriculum is designed to provide a lifetime of learning for emergency managers and includes three separate, but closely related, training programs. Those training programs include the National Emergency Management Basic Academy, a specialized and technical training program to develop specific skill sets; the National Emergency Management Advanced Academy, a program to develop the next generation of emergency management leaders who are trained in advanced concepts and issues, advanced leadership and management,  critical thinking, and problem solving; and, the National Emergency Management Executive Academy, a program designed to challenge and enhance the talents of emergency management senior executives through critical thinking, visionary strategic planning, negotiation, and conflict resolution applied to complex real-world problems.

For more information on FEMA’s training classes through the Basic, Advanced, and Executive Academies, or other emergency management courses, go to training.fema.gov/empp.

Workshop Offers Award-Winning Environmental Curriculum for S.C. Teachers

By Betsy Crick

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Nearly 50 teachers and environmental educators were trained in Conway this week as part of the Action for a Cleaner Tomorrow program.  This free training was provided by DHEC’s Office of Solid Waste Reduction and Recycling.

The curriculum is correlated to the state’s science standards. The current edition features 16 lessons, including topics such as recycling, waste reduction, composting, buying recycled, and air quality and water conservation.  Each lesson provides a learning objective, background information and teacher preparation materials.

Teachers at this week’s training also had the opportunity to tour the Horry County landfill and the county’s materials recovery facility.

DHEC has recently changed its training model to offer multiple smaller workshops around the state so that teachers don’t have to travel long distances to attend a single workshop in Columbia.  This was the second workshop of the summer, and nearly 140 teachers have been trained.

South Carolina is one of the few states in the nation that offers a program of this type.  Please visit DHEC’s website for more information.

Saving lives with CPR

By Jamie Shuster

Each year, almost 360,000 people suffer out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in the United States. Research shows that hands-only CPR can triple survival rates during these sudden cardiac arrest events.

Earlier this month, an individual in one of our Midland’s area offices passed out suddenly. One of our Public Health registered nurses, Latasha Lee, quickly assessed the person and realized the individual had no pulse and wasn’t breathing. Latasha immediately called for help while her fellow Public Health registered nurse, Charice Jones, began performing CPR on the individual. EMS soon arrived and transported the individual to a local hospital. Continue reading