Category Archives: Outreach

Use the Farmers and Roadside Market App This Summer for Local Fresh Produce Purchases at 356 Markets and Stands

Summer is in full swing.  Now is the time to take advantage of our state’s fresh produce by using the S.C. Farmers and Roadside Market App.  The web-based app shows the location, hours of operation and accepted payment types for hundreds of statewide farmers markets and roadside produce stands.

Payment types may include:  cash, credit cards, WIC, SNAP, and senior vouchers.

Approximately 356 markets and stands are on the app statewide.  In addition to giving locations and hours of markets and stands, the app also provides healthy recipes featuring in-season produce each month.

“The app makes it easy to find local, affordable options for fresh produce, which can empower families to make healthier food choices,” said Nick Davidson, DHEC interim director of Public Health.

Seasonal programs are also making local produce more affordable in various parts of the state.  DHEC’s WIC Farmers Market Nutrition Program provides WIC participants with checks that can be used to buy approved fresh produce at authorized farmers markets and roadside stands.

To use the S.C. Farmers and Roadside Market App, visit www.scdhec.gov/farmersmarkets.  For more information about WIC Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program, visit www.scdhec.gov/Health/WIC/FarmersMarkets/.

Last Day to Register for The Evidence Academy: Reducing Health Disparities in Our State, Held June 21

Join the South Carolina Cancer Alliance on Friday, June 21 from 9:30 AM to 3:00 PM for “Evidence Academy:  Reducing Health Disparities in Our State,” a FREE workshop for health care professionals and advocates.  The premise of the event is to discuss health disparities in cancer.  While mortality rates have declined for many cancers in South Carolina, significant racial disparities persist.

The event will be held at the South Carolina Hospital Association, 1000 Center Point Road, where attendees will learn how to:

  • Relate to the environment of underserved communities
  • Understand four major factors essential to self-development
  • Practice self-reflection and self-awareness
  • Understand bias, implicit bias, and privilege
  • Understand the collateral consequences of structural inequality.

Speakers include:  Scott E. Porter, MD, MBA, FACS, FAOA and Brian Chad Starks, PhD.  Dr. Porter currently serves as the Vice President of Equity and Inclusion and is the former Residency Program Director in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Prisma Health – Upstate.  Dr. Starks is a nationally recognized expert on Cultural Competency, Diversity and Inclusion, Equity and the disruption of Implicit Bias.

Registration is FREE and lunch will be provided.  To register or for more information, visit www.sccancer.org or call 803.708.4732.

5 Fast Facts About Sickle Cell Disease on World Sickle Cell Day

Today is World Sickle Cell Day.  Sickle cell disease affects millions of people worldwide and is particularly common among people originating from sub-Saharan Africa, Saudi Arabia, India, South America and Central America, and Mediterranean countries, such as Turkey, Greece, and Italy.

  1. Sickle cell disease is a group of inherited red blood cell disorders. The red blood cells become hard and sticky and look like a C-shaped farm tool called a “sickle” and the cells die early, which causes a constant storage of red blood cells. Healthy red blood cells are round and move through small blood vessels to carry oxygen to all parts of the body.
  2. SCD affects approximately 100,000 Americans and occurs in about 1 out of every 365 African-American births.
  3. To get SCD, the trait must be inherited from both parents who already have the SCD trait. People with the trait usually do not have any of the signs of the disease and live a normal life, but they can pass the trait to their children.
  4. SCD is diagnosed with a simple blood test. It is most often found at birth during routine newborn screening tests.  Early diagnosis and treatment are important.
  5. The only cure for SCD is a bone marrow or stem cell transplant. These transplants are very risky, and can have serious side effects, including death.  For the transplant to work, the bone marrow must be a close match (usually a brother or sister).

sickle-cell-checklist-rect

The Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC)’s Sickle Cell Program helps people who have SCD pay for medical services, supplies, equipment and medications.  To learn more about the program visit:  https://www.scdhec.gov/health/child-teen-health/services-children-special-health-care-needs/18-and-older-sickle-cell.

Now Accepting Nominations for DHEC’s Community Star Award, Deadline August 1st

Do you know an organization (or someone) who is committed to going above and beyond environmental requirements to build better community relationships, promote environmental sustainability and improve the quality of life for communities?  Nominate them!

Community Star winners are awarded in three categories:  business star, collaborative star, and rising star.  You can either be nominated or self-apply.  Complete the nomination form before August 1, 2019.

For more information about the selection process and benefits of being a DHEC Community Star, visit https://www.scdhec.gov/environment/community-star or contact Rebecca Sproles, Office of Environmental Affairs, at sprolemr@dhec.sc.gov.  Read more about last year’s winners here.

DHEC In the News: Obtaining Burn Permits, First SC Green Ribbon School Award & Swim Advisories

Here’s a look at health and environmental news around South Carolina.

Jasper County Fire-Rescue reminds residents to get burn permits

 

RIDGELAND, S.C. (Bluffton Today) Jasper County Fire-Rescue said in May it has responded to more than 380 calls for service. Crews also responded to seven brush fires, with JCFR saying six were preventable.  JCFR advises residents that anytime you decide to burn, the State Precautions Law requires anyone not within city or town limits to obtain a burn permit from the South Carolina Forestry Commission before lighting the fire.

 

First South Carolina School honored as U.S. Department of Education Green Ribbon School for Environmental Initiatives

COLUMBIA, S.C. (MidlandsBiz.com) Dutch Fork Elementary School in Lexington County is the first South Carolina school to be recognized nationally by the U.S. Department of Education for environmentally conscious programming.  The S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC), in a partnership with the S.C. Department of Education, the S.C. Energy Office and a variety of state and local partners, nominated Dutch Fork Elementary School to be recognized as a U.S. Department of Education Green Ribbon School (ED-GRS).

 

DHEC urges people to avoid swimming at this section of Myrtle Beach due to high bacteria levels

 

MYRTLE BEACH, S.C. (Fox Carolina) The advisory is for water at the public access point at 17th Avenue South in North Myrtle Beach.  DHEC said bacteria levels that are above state and federal standards were detected in the water, and swimming is not advised in the area until bacteria levels return to normal.