Tag Archives: health

From Other Blogs: Impacts of smoking on women, opioid crisis, cervical cancer screening & more

A collection of health and environmental posts from other governmental blogs.

Impacts of smoking on women

There is abundant research about the many harms of smoking – whether it’s the dangerous chemicals, the addictive properties or the damage smoking causes to the body. The effects of smoking can have a profound impact on your health and those around you.

Here are some facts about smoking and its impact on women’s health.

— From Flourish, Palmetto Health’s blog

Opioid Crisis Affects All Americans, Rural and Urban

Every day, more than 90 Americans die after overdosing on opioids. That’s three people every hour.

As if the death rate wasn’t bad enough, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that the “economic burden” of prescription opioid misuse in the United States is $78.5 billion a year, including the costs of healthcare, lost productivity, and addiction treatment.

 From the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) blog

Get the Facts: 3 Myths about Cervical Cancer Screening

I recently attended a school reunion and was able to catch up with some former classmates. I had not seen many of them for over 10 years. Of all the conversations I had that weekend, one about cervical cancer screening has stuck in my mind. As a friend and I discussed what we do, I mentioned that most of my work in the past few years has focused on cervical cancer prevention and research. She was curious to learn more about the need for screening.

My friend told me that she had not been screened for cervical cancer since the birth of her now 10-year-old daughter. What followed was a conversation where she gave me her reasons for not getting screened. I listened and tried to shed light on the myths she believed that make it okay for her to avoid screening.

— From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) The Topic Is Cancer blog

What’s Cooking? USDA Mixing Bowl’s #2017BestNine

As 2017 has come to a close, the What’s Cooking team at USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service is joining the #2017BestNine fun – a social media trend where users share their favorite or most popular moments of the year – by taking a look back at our top-viewed recipes. From quinoa to quesadillas, we are proud to share our users’ favorite recipes.

 From the USDA blog

Here Are Six Tips To Help Make 2018 Your Healthiest Year Yet

If you want to make this your healthiest new year yet, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has got some tips help you boost your health and well-being.

  1. Make an appointment for a check-upvaccination, or screening. Regular oral and medical exams and tests can help find problems before they start or early in the process.
  2. Wash your hands often with soap and water to prevent the spread of infection and illness.
  3. Make healthy food choices. A healthy eating plan includes fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and fat-free or low-fat milk, milk products, lean meats, poultry and fish. Make sure foods are low in saturated fats, trans fats, cholesterol, salt (sodium), and added sugars.
  4. Get active! Start small – try taking the stairs instead of the elevator. Consider mall walking if the weather is cold or icy.
  5. Be smokefree. If you are ready to quit, call 1-800-QUIT-NOW (1-800-784-8669) or 1-855-DÉJELO-YA (1-855-335-3569 for Spanish speakers) for free resources, including free quit coaching, a free quit plan, free educational materials, and referrals to other resources where you live.
  6. Get enough sleep. Adults need seven or more hours nightly.

From Other Blogs: Sustainable healthy New Year’s resolutions, colorectal cancer screening, drone technology & more

A collection of health and environmental posts from other governmental blogs.

Making sustainable changes in the new year

New year’s resolutions are upon us and instead of following the latest fad diet or workout that you’ll be over in a month’s time, try something different. This year, why not make one single change each week that is realistic and one you can stick with?

This seems, perhaps, too simple, but the results can be massive! By making small, realistic and sustainable changes you can lose double, even triple the amount of weight than you would with some 30-day challenge. How, you ask? Because you’ll stick with it! — From Flourish, Palmetto Health’s blog

The Six Steps New Hampshire Took to Get More People Screened for Colorectal Cancer

Screening at the right age can find colorectal cancer before it starts, but some people still don’t go for many reasons. A CDC-funded program in New Hampshire created a way to overcome the problems patients had getting screened. — From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) The Topic Is Cancer blog

Drone Collects Information to Benefit Great Lakes

The USDA Forest Service and Michigan Technological University (MTech) are using unmanned aerial systems, or drones, to advise the Hiawatha National Forest’s land management efforts.

Located in Michigan’s wild and scenic Upper Peninsula, the Hiawatha National Forest’s dramatic shorelines lie nestled up to Lake Superior, Huron, and Michigan – three of the five Great Lakes. — From the USDA blog

MyPlate Makes It Easier for Health Professionals to Encourage Healthier Lifestyles in 2018

The energy and excitement of beginning a new year makes January a popular time for making New Year’s resolutions. Often, two of the most popular resolutions focus on health: to get fit and to lose weight.

As health professionals know all too well, many people establish lofty goals on January 1, only to drop their resolutions by June. One reason so many struggle may be that they incorporate extreme goals that may not be realistic. A more helpful strategy could be to start with small steps and celebrate milestones along the way. As nutrition and health professionals prepare to help their clients and patients meet their New Year’s health resolutions, MyPlate, MyWins is a great place to start. Let MyPlate,MyWins be a resource to help you assist your clients in turning resolutions into real solutions for a healthy new year. — From the U.S. Department of Agriculture blog

Take the Healthy Body, Healthy Brain Pledge

As important as it is to take good care of your body, it’s equally critical that you keep your brain healthy.

That is why DHEC is partnering with the Alzheimer’s Association South Carolina ChapterThe American Heart Association and Eat Smart Move More South Carolina to raise awareness about Alzheimer’s disease and brain health.

As part of the awareness campaign, the partners are encouraging people to Take Brain Health to Heart and pledge to keep their body, heart and brain healthy. The Healthy Body, Healthy Brain pledge can be found at www.scdhec.gov/brainhealthpledge.

The intent is quite simple: to motivate South Carolinians to protect their brain health by taking proactive steps such as being more active and eating better. Research has shown that smoking, obesity, high blood pressure and diabetes may contribute to cognitive decline. It has also found that unhealthy eating, lack of physical activity and brain injury may affect the health of the brain.

The campaign features a centralized DHEC Brain Health webpage. People who visit the page and take the pledge are entered into a monthly drawing for a Fitbit; the drawings end June 30. Please visit the webpage at www.scdhec.gov/brainhealth and take the pledge.

Make Halloween SAFE and HEALTHY

halloween_socialKids love Halloween – dressing up, going to parties and, of course, eating yummy treats. But parents need to keep some guidelines in mind to make sure the day is full of treats, not tricks. Use these tips to make the festivities SAFE and HEALTHY.

Swords, knives and other costume accessories should be short, soft and flexible.

Avoid trick-or-treating alone. Walk in groups or with a trusted adult.

Fasten reflective tape to costumes and bags to help drivers see you.

Examine all treats for choking hazards and tampering before eating them. Limit the amount of treats you eat.

and

Hand out some healthier treats for trick-or-treaters such as low-calorie treats and drinks. For party guests, offer a variety of fruits and vegetables.

Exercise can be part of the fun. Use party games and trick-or-treat time as an opportunity for kids to get their daily dose of 60 minutes of physical activity.

Avoid walking areas and stairs that aren’t well-lit and free of obstacles that could cause someone to fall.

Look both ways before crossing the street. Use crosswalks wherever possible.

Test make-up in a small area first. Remove it before bedtime to prevent possible skin and eye irritation.

Hold a flashlight while trick-or-treating to help you see and others see you.

Yes, a little candy is OK, but limit the sweet treats beyond the holiday.

For more ideas on safe, healthy Halloween fun, check out these pages: