Tag Archives: health

Help Yourself And Others Avoid Type 2 Diabetes

One in three adults is at risk for developing type 2 diabetes. It is a serious disease that can lead to complications like kidney failure, heart disease, stroke, blindness, and amputations.  Type 2 diabetes doesn’t have to be permanent—it can be prevented by using healthy lifestyle changes. You have to be a self-advocate for your own health care.

Take Action!

DHEC is participating in the annual American Diabetes Association Alert Day® today, March 27. We encourage you to take the Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test to find out if you are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes. You’ll answer questions such as, “Do you have a family history of diabetes?” and “Are you physically active?” It’s easy and it’s fast. It only takes 60 seconds!

Sound the Alarm

Bring awareness to the prevalence of type 2 diabetes by asking everyone to take the Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test. The first step is learning your risk. The second step is getting your loved ones involved as well sharing the Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test.

Click here to learn more about prediabetes and what you can do to prevent type 2 diabetes.

DHEC in the News: Opioid abuse, diabetes champion, student-grown gardens

Here’s a look at health and environmental news from around South Carolina.

DAODAS director: Public education on opioid abuse, targeted programs key to saving lives

A comprehensive public education campaign, targeted programming and a laser-like focus on recovery are strategies the South Carolina Department of Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Services is employing to try to prevent deaths from opioid overdoses in the state.

Newly confirmed DAODAS Director Sara Goldsby said while more people are seeking treatment for opioid abuse, the opioid crisis has not yet leveled off because the state is still seeing more overdoses and more deaths from overdoses.

HopeHealth provider named diabetes champion

FLORENCE, S.C. – HopeHealth’s Christy Evans was presented the Diabetes Champion of the Year Award on March 9 during the 16th annual Chronic Disease Prevention Symposium in Myrtle Beach.

The award, presented by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, recognizes individuals who have made “substantial advancement in improving health care systems to improve care for patients through well-defined measures” with particular attention to nationally recommended diabetes standards of care.

Pee Dee students to grow gardens

FLORENCE, S.C. — Students at a few Florence schools and churches will soon have the pleasure of eating homegrown foods as a result of design and construction grants to install raised garden beds from the city and the local chapter of Eat Smart Move More.

The schools and churches are Carver Elementary Magnet School, North Vista Elementary School and Southside Middle School, plus the preschool at Central United Methodist Church, the youth program at Cumberland United Methodist Church and John Calvin Presbyterian Church.

It’s Sleep Awareness Week: Be Sure You Get Your Zs

sleepSleep is a vital indicator of overall health and well-being. We spend up to one-third of our lives asleep, and the overall state of our “sleep health” remains an essential question throughout our lifespan.

Join the National Sleep Foundation in celebrating its annual Sleep Awareness Week, March 11 to 17, 2018. This year’s theme, “Begin with Sleep,” highlights the importance of good sleep health for individuals to best achieve their personal, family, and professional goals.

A good night’s sleep can depend on:

How much sleep do you need to be your best self?

Most of us know that getting a good night’s sleep is important, but too few of us actually make those eight or so hours between the sheets a priority. For many of us with sleep debt, we’ve forgotten what “being really, truly rested” feels like.

To further complicate matters, stimulants like coffee and energy drinks, alarm clocks, and external lights—including those from electronic devices—interfere with our “circadian rhythm” or natural sleep/wake cycle.

Sleep needs vary across ages and are especially impacted by lifestyle and health. To determine how much sleep you need, it’s important to assess not only where you fall on the “sleep needs spectrum,” but also to examine what lifestyle factors are affecting the quality and quantity of your sleep such as work schedules and stress.

Check out the Bedtime Calculator, which can help you plan your sleep.

sleep chart

Make Sleep a Priority

To begin a new path towards healthier sleep and a healthier lifestyle, begin by assessing your own individual needs and habits. See how you respond to different amounts of sleep.

Pay careful attention to your mood, energy and health after a poor night’s sleep versus a good one. Ask yourself, “How often do I get a good night’s sleep?” Like good diet and exercise, sleep is a critical component to overall health.

To pave the way for better sleep, follow these simple yet effective healthy sleep tips, including:

If you or a family member are experiencing symptoms such as sleepiness during the day or when you expect to be awake and alert, snoring, leg cramps or tingling, gasping or difficulty breathing during sleep, prolonged insomnia or another symptom that is preventing you from sleeping well, you should consult your primary care physician or  find a sleep professional to determine the underlying cause.

You may also try using the National Sleep Foundation Sleep Diary to track your sleep habits over a one- or two-week period and bring the results to your physician.

Most importantly, make sleep a priority. You must schedule sleep like any other daily activity, so put it on your “to-do list” and cross it off every night. But don’t make it the thing you do only after everything else is done; stop doing other things so you get the sleep you need.

From Other Blogs: National School Breakfast Week, lowering your cancer risk, tackling eHealth literacy & more

A collection of health and environmental posts from other governmental blogs.

A Healthy Start to the School Day Leads to Bright Opportunities Ahead

Wholesome meals at school support educational achievement – and bright SchoolBreakfast-launch 2opportunities ahead for our nation’s kids and teens. Which is why, each year, during National School Breakfast Week (March 5-9), USDA recognizes the importance of a healthy start and the many ways the School Breakfast Program improves the health and nutrition of school children nationwide. — From the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) blog

Lowering Your Cancer Risk: A Matter of Ups and Downs

Think of listening to your favorite song. No matter what kind of music it is, someone was behind the scenes making it sound great: bringing out certain parts or instruments, balancing it, getting rid of background noise.

Cutting your cancer risk is a little bit like making great music. You turn some things up, turn some things down, and get rid of some things altogether. And you don’t have to be a professional to make choices that can help keep you doing what you love for a long time. — From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) The Topic Is Cancer blog

Prevent Colorectal Cancer: We Can Do It!

“A childhood friend has late-stage colon cancer. The prognosis is grim. But this is one cancer you can prevent,” writes Cindy Gelb, lead of CDC’s Screen for Life campaign. “One more late-stage diagnosis is one too many. Each of us really can make a difference.” — From the CDC’s The Topic Is Cancer blog

Tackling eHealth Literacy

As I waited in the exam room on a recent visit to my doctor’s office, I noticed there was a large wall display with an interactive screen. It resembled a smartphone and I could use the touchscreen to scroll and learn about various conditions, diabetesheart diseaseAlzheimer’s, and colon health. Each menu included signs and symptoms of illness, and information on diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. The designs were bright, jargon was kept to a minimum and defined when used, and navigating was simple for routine smartphone users. The display also included short videos supporting the on-screen text.

“Great!” I thought, “But what about patients who don’t have strong English skills or those who don’t feel confident engaging with the display? How do they get the information if they don’t directly ask for it?” — From the CDC’s Public Health Matters blog

2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans: We Want to Hear from You

Interested in being part of our process as we develop the 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA)? Start today at DietaryGuidelines.gov. — From the USDA blog

DHEC in the News: Flu, sewage discharge, American Heart Month & more

Here’s a look at health and environmental news from around South Carolina.

DHEC: Week 8 of high-activity flu season brings second child death to South Carolina

Horry County, S.C. (WPDE) — The eighth week of flu season brought the second flu-related child death of this year, according to a report by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC).

In its weekly flu watch report, DHEC said the week of Feb. 18 to Feb. 24 was the 11th consecutive week of widespread flu activity.

2 million gallons of sewage discharged into the Stono River

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – The Department of Health and Environmental control says an estimated 2.4 million gallons of sewage discharged into the headwaters of the Stono River over the course of 8 days.

According to DHEC, the Town of Hollywood noticed disruption of flow in a wastewater line on February 19, 2018. The disruption indicated a problem with the collection system.

Take care of your heart during Heart Health Month

Heart disease is a leading cause of early death and disability in South Carolina. The S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control encourages residents to adopt habits to keep their hearts healthy.

In 2016, heart disease was the second leading cause of death in the Palmetto State. But small changes can make a big difference.

General Interest

1 in 14 women still smokes while pregnant, CDC says

(CNN)About one in 14 pregnant women who gave birth in the United States in 2016 smoked cigarettes during her pregnancy, according to a report released Wednesday.

The findings, gathered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics, revealed that 7.2% of all expectant mothers smoked — but that the percentage of pregnant smokers varied widely from state to state.