Tag Archives: nutrition

From Other Blogs: Nutrition Tips for Men, Summer Camp Food Safety, Cancer Prevention for Older Adults

A collection of health and environmental posts from other governmental blogs.

Nutrition tips all men should know

For many men, nutrition is not a focus until much later in life. Because it’s best to start healthy habits as soon as possible, Lisa Money, registered dietitian nutritionist with Apex Athletic Performance, explains the importance of good nutrition throughout every stage of a man’s life.– From Flourish, Prisma Health’s blog

Keeping Hands Clean and Summer Camp Trip Foods Safe

Does your child’s summer camp itinerary include outdoorsy trips that require them to bring snacks? How will you fulfill their taste buds while keeping perishable snacks safe? How will you make sure kids will clean their hands before eating? These trips will probably be in hot, sunny weather, and that can come with food safety risks. Let’s keep calm and be food safe this summer! – From U.S. Department of Agriculture’s blog

The Value of Prevention Does Not End at 65

“Medical science deserves hearty congratulations for extending the lifespan of Americans to 80 years and beyond. This is truly an impressive feat, considering that most babies born in 1900 did not live past the age of 50.  I rejoice in my own longevity, as I’m sure you do. But I also wonder whether the same health care system that gave me these extra years is doing its best to help me make sure those years are healthy ones.  Frankly, I have my doubts.” Robyn Stone, DrPH

– From The Topic is Cancer, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Blog

Use the Farmers and Roadside Market App This Summer for Local Fresh Produce Purchases at 356 Markets and Stands

Summer is in full swing.  Now is the time to take advantage of our state’s fresh produce by using the S.C. Farmers and Roadside Market App.  The web-based app shows the location, hours of operation and accepted payment types for hundreds of statewide farmers markets and roadside produce stands.

Payment types may include:  cash, credit cards, WIC, SNAP, and senior vouchers.

Approximately 356 markets and stands are on the app statewide.  In addition to giving locations and hours of markets and stands, the app also provides healthy recipes featuring in-season produce each month.

“The app makes it easy to find local, affordable options for fresh produce, which can empower families to make healthier food choices,” said Nick Davidson, DHEC interim director of Public Health.

Seasonal programs are also making local produce more affordable in various parts of the state.  DHEC’s WIC Farmers Market Nutrition Program provides WIC participants with checks that can be used to buy approved fresh produce at authorized farmers markets and roadside stands.

To use the S.C. Farmers and Roadside Market App, visit www.scdhec.gov/farmersmarkets.  For more information about WIC Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program, visit www.scdhec.gov/Health/WIC/FarmersMarkets/.

Food Recall Alert: Johnsonville Jalapeño Cheddar Smoked Sausage Links

Approximately 95,393 lbs of Johnsonville Jalapeño Cheddar Smoked Sausage Links have been recalled due to possible contamination with hard green plastic.

This is a serious Class I recall so check your fridge and freezer. These products were shipped nationwide and internationally.  The jalapeño cheddar smoked sausage items were produced and packaged on March 12 and 13, 2019. The following products are subject to recall: [View labels (PDF only)]

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is concerned that some products may be in consumers’ refrigerators or freezers. Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

Consumers with questions about the recall can contact Kirsten Bishir, Johnsonville, LLC. Consumer Relations Coordinator, at KBishir@johnsonville.com and by phone or text at 1-888-556-2728. For more information about the recall, visit:  https://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/recalls-and-public-health-alerts/recall-case-archive/archive/2019/recall-063-2019-release.

Understanding Date Labels on Packaged Foods to Reduce Food Waste

What does the label “Best If Used By” when purchasing foods and beverages actually mean?  The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) want you to know the facts before you throw your items away.

  • “Best if Used By” labeling is standardized to provide a date that is related to optimal quality – not safety. This tells consumers that certain products do not have to be discarded after the date if they are stored properly.
  • An “expiration date” is only used for baby formula. This is the only date label that is federally required.
  • Date labels are created by manufacturers at their own discretion. The main reason for this is to notify consumers and retailers of the date where they can expect the food to retain its desired quality and flavor.
  • The FDA advises consumers to routinely examine foods in their kitchen cabinets or pantry that are past the “Best if Used By” date to determine if the quality is sufficient for use. If the products have changed noticeably in color, consistency or texture, or smell, consumers may want to avoid eating them.
  • Reduce food waste by refrigerating peeled or cut vegetables for freshness, quality or safety. Store foods in the freezer to retain quality.  Avoid bulk and impulse purchases, especially of produce and dairy products that have a limited shelf life.  Request smaller portions when eating out.  Bring your leftovers home, and refrigerate/freeze them within two hours.

Between the food industry and consumers, Americans throw out about a third of our food – approximately $161 billion worth each year.  For more tips to reduce food waste, visit:  https://www.fda.gov/food/consumers/tips-reduce-food-waste.

Don't Waste Food SC_0

Don’t Waste Food SC is a collaborative outreach campaign that focuses on bringing together every individual and organization in South Carolina to prevent, donate or compost extra food rather than wasting it. Initially a partnership of the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) and S.C. Department of Commerce, ambassadors now include K-12 schools, businesses, food retailers and manufacturers, non-profit organizations, municipalities and local governments, colleges/universities, residents, restaurants and hospitality establishments as well as many others. For more information or to get involved, please visit Don’t Waste Food SC or email dontwastefoodsc@dhec.sc.gov.

Download the rack card specifically addressing product labeling as an easy reference tool.

From Other Blogs: American Food Dollars, Stroke Risk Factors for Women, Prepare Your Health for Hurricane Season

A collection of health and environmental posts from other governmental blogs.

Where Do Americans’ Food Dollars Go?

In 2017, consumers in the United States spent $1.2 trillion on U.S.-produced food. Nearly all food starts out on a farm, but did you ever wonder how the value added from processing, packaging, transporting, and marketing agricultural food products factors into the costs? – From U.S. Department of Agriculture’s blog

 

Risk factors for stroke every woman should know

More women die from stroke than breast cancer every year. Shocked? It’s true. In fact, stroke is the third leading cause of death in women, while it is the fifth for men, and women are more likely to have another stroke within five years of their first stroke. So what is it that makes strokes affect women differently than men? Anil Yallapragada, MD, Palmetto Health-USC Neurology, explained. – From Flourish, Prisma Health’s blog

 

Prepare Your Health for Hurricane Season

In all, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), of which the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is a member, has a list of 21 names that they will use this year to identify hurricanes during the Atlantic hurricane season.  What’s in a name? A major hurricane by any name is hazardous to public health and safety, potentially life threatening, and important to prepare for.

– From Public Health Matters, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Blog