Tag Archives: cancer

Last Day to Register for The Evidence Academy: Reducing Health Disparities in Our State, Held June 21

Join the South Carolina Cancer Alliance on Friday, June 21 from 9:30 AM to 3:00 PM for “Evidence Academy:  Reducing Health Disparities in Our State,” a FREE workshop for health care professionals and advocates.  The premise of the event is to discuss health disparities in cancer.  While mortality rates have declined for many cancers in South Carolina, significant racial disparities persist.

The event will be held at the South Carolina Hospital Association, 1000 Center Point Road, where attendees will learn how to:

  • Relate to the environment of underserved communities
  • Understand four major factors essential to self-development
  • Practice self-reflection and self-awareness
  • Understand bias, implicit bias, and privilege
  • Understand the collateral consequences of structural inequality.

Speakers include:  Scott E. Porter, MD, MBA, FACS, FAOA and Brian Chad Starks, PhD.  Dr. Porter currently serves as the Vice President of Equity and Inclusion and is the former Residency Program Director in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Prisma Health – Upstate.  Dr. Starks is a nationally recognized expert on Cultural Competency, Diversity and Inclusion, Equity and the disruption of Implicit Bias.

Registration is FREE and lunch will be provided.  To register or for more information, visit www.sccancer.org or call 803.708.4732.

DHEC In the News:  Earthquake emergency preparedness, High Cancer Rates in Anderson County, & Swim Advisories

Here’s a look at health and environmental news around South Carolina.

Training keeps first responders up to date with emergency response

KINGSTREE, S.C. (The Kingstree News) On May 16, the Williamsburg County Emergency Management/E-911 Division (EMD) held an Earthquake Tabletop Exercise for Williamsburg County agencies who continually update preparedness in case such an event occurs. There is not a completely reliable method for predicting the time, place and size of an earthquake, especially since the majority of earthquakes occur in the Coastal Plain. Experts do agree that where earthquakes have occurred before, they can again. Therefore it is always important to be prepared.

 

Anderson County cancer rates among the highest in South Carolina and nationally

ANDERSON, S.C. (Anderson Independent Mail) Over the past decade, Anderson County has consistently had more people getting cancer for the first time than the state and national average.

Anderson County is ranked eighth-highest out of the state’s 46 counties for incidences of all types of cancers, according to information provided by the State Department of Health and Environmental Control. Cancer was the leading cause of death in Anderson County, and the second in South Carolina, as of 2017.

 

Carolina This Week with DHEC’s Bryan Rabon

MYRTLE BEACH, S.C. (WPDE-ABC) Bryan Rabon, DHEC’s manager of aquatic science programs, sat down with “Carolina This Week” host Trey Paul to talk about beach monitoring season and the purpose of swim advisories.

Be Sun Safe: May is Skin Cancer Prevention Month

(GIF Credit:  https://giphy.com/gifs/qutisuYBaGfFC)

Sundress and shorts season has officially begun.  Are you protected?  According to the 2018 South Carolina Health Assessment, melanoma of skin (skin cancer) is the 5th leading cause of new cancer cases in the state (see below).

Skin Cancer Table

Did you know that skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States with nearly 5 million people treated each year?  Skin cancer is caused by too much exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays from the sun and other sources such as tanning beds.  Anyone can get skin cancer, but it can be cured if found and treated early.  Talk to your doctor if you notice any unusual moles or changes to your skin.

Whether you are taking a trip to the beach or doing some much-needed gardening, it is important to protect your skin from the sun.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), here are some tips to keep in mind:

  • Stay in the shade, especially during midday hours
  • Wear clothing that covers your arms and legs
  • Wear a hat with a wide brim to shade your face, head, ears, and neck
  • Wear sunglasses that wrap around and block UVA and UVB rays
  • Use sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) or 15 or higher, and both UVA and UV protection
  • Avoid indoor tanning

Being in the sun does not have to be worrisome.  Just make sure you protect yourself. Visit the CDC for more fun safety tips and  follow their  hashtag #SunSafeSelfie for pictures of people all over the world who are taking action to protect themselves from the sun – and having fun while doing it!

From Other Blogs: Heart failure Symptoms, Addressing Obesity Health Disparities, When Cancer Runs in the Family

A collection of health and environmental posts from other governmental blogs.

Heart failure symptoms you shouldn’t ignore

One out of every five people over the age of 40 will develop heart failure at some point in their lifetime. Right now, around 6 million Americans have heart failure, and another 900,000 people will develop it each year. Heart failure is a big issue, so it’s important to know the facts in case it happens to you or someone you love. – From Flourish, Prisma Health’s blog

Addressing Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities in Adult Obesity and Encouraging Physical Activity this National Minority Health Month

Every person should be able to reach his or her full health potential. I’m proud of the work we do in CDC’s Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity (DNPAO) to support Americans’ journey to good health—especially among people most vulnerable to chronic disease. We protect the health of Americans at every stage of life by encouraging regular physical activity and good nutrition, helping to prevent obesity in children and adults, and addressing barriers to treating obesity in children. – From Conversations in Equity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Blog

When Cancer Runs in the Family

I remember watching her pack a footlocker and suitcase for her first year of college. As I sat there on her purple crushed velvet bedspread, I wondered how long she would be gone. My Aunt Pat was the first woman in our family to go to college, so I didn’t exactly know how this was supposed to work. All I knew was that I would really miss her while she was gone and that I definitely wanted to go to this “college” place when I grew up. – From The Topic is Cancer, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Blog

From Other Blogs: Stopping type 2 diabetes, understanding gynecologic cancers, ending health disparities & more

A collection of health and environmental posts from other governmental blogs.

Putting a stop to type 2 diabetes

Did you know that diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States? It is estimated that by the year 2020, 50 percent of Americans will either have diabetes or be pre-diabetic, but there is a way to prevent this.  — From Flourish, Palmetto Health’s blog

Let’s Help Women Understand: What We Need to Know About Gynecologic Cancers

Once upon a time, women were told to get a Pap test every year. And most of us did, even though it wasn’t always clear why we were being tested. We just did what we were told and thought it was a surefire way to stay healthy. But times and recommendations have changed about what test to have, how often to have it, and the reason to have it. — From the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) The Topic Is Cancer blog

Mission Possible: A Year in Review

As a long-time scientist and physician, I’ve treated patients in a range of environments – from U.S. cities and military bases, to sub-Saharan Africa and Haiti in the aftermath of the devastating earthquake in 2010. Throughout those experiences, I saw firsthand the impact that health disparities could have on health outcomes. That’s why – even when treating single patients – it was important to always consider the social determinants of that individual’s health.

The inequity in health that we see across the world today remains one of the greatest social injustices of our time. Access to healthcare and behaviors is greatly influenced by social factors and environment, including housing, transportation, and education. As the nation’s leading public health agency, CDC plays a crucial role in promoting the practice of health equity, and I’m committed to seeing that CDC puts science into action to confront the gaps in health and the social determinants behind those inequities. — From the CDC’s Conversations in Equity blog

New HRSA Program Will Help Clinicians and Patients in the Fight Against Opioid Addiction

On December 27, 2018 HRSA launched a program that is critical to HHS’ response to the opioid crisis. This National Health Service Corps Substance Use Disorder Workforce Loan Repayment Progam will support the HHS Five-Point Opioid Strategy by increasing patient access to high-quality substance use disorder preventive, treatment, and recovery services. — From the US Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS) blog

Superfood of the Month: Cauliflower

Cauliflower is considered one of the healthiest foods on Earth and with good reason. It has a rich supply of health-promoting phytochemicals, a high level of anti-inflammatory compounds, and the ability to ward off cancer, heart disease, brain disease and weight gain. There isn’t much cauliflower can’t do. — From Lexington Medical Center’s official blog