Tag Archives: food safety

Food Recall Alert: King Arthur Flour Recall Due to E.coli

Approximately 14,218 cases of 5 lb. Unbleached All-Purpose Flour has been recalled due to the potential presence of Escherichia coli bacteria (E. coli).  No illnesses have been reported to date.

Only the following codes and Best Used by Dates are affected by the recall.

BEST USED BY 12/07/19   LOT:   L18A07C
BEST USED BY 12/08/19   LOTS: L18A08A, L18A08B
BEST USED BY 12/14/19   LOTS: L18A14A, L18A14B, L18A14C

King Arthur Recall 2

Consumers who have any of these affected products should not consume them and should throw them away or return them to the place of purchase for credit or refund.

E.coli are bacteria found in the environment, foods, and intestines of people and animals.  Although most strains are harmless, some strains can make you sick.  E.coli may cause diarrhea, urinary tract infections, respiratory illness and pneumonia, and other illnesses.

As a reminder, please wash your hands, work surfaces, and utensils thoroughly after contact with raw dough products or flour, and to never eat raw dough or batter. For more information about risks of consuming raw dough, refer to the following: https://www.cdc.gov/features/norawdough/index.html.

Read more about the recall here.

Food Recall Alert: Johnsonville Jalapeño Cheddar Smoked Sausage Links

Approximately 95,393 lbs of Johnsonville Jalapeño Cheddar Smoked Sausage Links have been recalled due to possible contamination with hard green plastic.

This is a serious Class I recall so check your fridge and freezer. These products were shipped nationwide and internationally.  The jalapeño cheddar smoked sausage items were produced and packaged on March 12 and 13, 2019. The following products are subject to recall: [View labels (PDF only)]

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is concerned that some products may be in consumers’ refrigerators or freezers. Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

Consumers with questions about the recall can contact Kirsten Bishir, Johnsonville, LLC. Consumer Relations Coordinator, at KBishir@johnsonville.com and by phone or text at 1-888-556-2728. For more information about the recall, visit:  https://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/recalls-and-public-health-alerts/recall-case-archive/archive/2019/recall-063-2019-release.

Understanding Date Labels on Packaged Foods to Reduce Food Waste

What does the label “Best If Used By” when purchasing foods and beverages actually mean?  The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) want you to know the facts before you throw your items away.

  • “Best if Used By” labeling is standardized to provide a date that is related to optimal quality – not safety. This tells consumers that certain products do not have to be discarded after the date if they are stored properly.
  • An “expiration date” is only used for baby formula. This is the only date label that is federally required.
  • Date labels are created by manufacturers at their own discretion. The main reason for this is to notify consumers and retailers of the date where they can expect the food to retain its desired quality and flavor.
  • The FDA advises consumers to routinely examine foods in their kitchen cabinets or pantry that are past the “Best if Used By” date to determine if the quality is sufficient for use. If the products have changed noticeably in color, consistency or texture, or smell, consumers may want to avoid eating them.
  • Reduce food waste by refrigerating peeled or cut vegetables for freshness, quality or safety. Store foods in the freezer to retain quality.  Avoid bulk and impulse purchases, especially of produce and dairy products that have a limited shelf life.  Request smaller portions when eating out.  Bring your leftovers home, and refrigerate/freeze them within two hours.

Between the food industry and consumers, Americans throw out about a third of our food – approximately $161 billion worth each year.  For more tips to reduce food waste, visit:  https://www.fda.gov/food/consumers/tips-reduce-food-waste.

Don't Waste Food SC_0

Don’t Waste Food SC is a collaborative outreach campaign that focuses on bringing together every individual and organization in South Carolina to prevent, donate or compost extra food rather than wasting it. Initially a partnership of the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) and S.C. Department of Commerce, ambassadors now include K-12 schools, businesses, food retailers and manufacturers, non-profit organizations, municipalities and local governments, colleges/universities, residents, restaurants and hospitality establishments as well as many others. For more information or to get involved, please visit Don’t Waste Food SC or email dontwastefoodsc@dhec.sc.gov.

Download the rack card specifically addressing product labeling as an easy reference tool.

Grill The Right Way This Summer

(GIF Credit:  https://giphy.com/gifs/alroker-al-roker-3ohzdWXQoDiUgiqbao)

Did you know that food poisoning peaks in the summer months due to warmer temperatures causing foodborne germs to spread?  Memorial Day Weekend is right around the corner.  Avoid food poisoning by taking the necessary precautions when grilling.  Follow these steps from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to ensure you are cooking the healthy way:

  • Separate meat, poultry, and seafood in your shopping cart and grocery bags to guard against cross-contamination. Put packages of raw meat and poultry into individual plastic bags.
  • Keep meat, poultry, and seafood refrigerated until ready to grill. When transporting, keep below 40 degrees Fahrenheit in an insulated cooler.
  • Wash your hands with soap BEFORE and AFTER handling raw meat, poultry, and seafood. Wash work surfaces, utensils, and the grill before and after cooking.
  • Clean your grill and tools. Use a moist cloth to clean the surface before cooking.
  • When using marinades and sauces that have touched raw meat, pour out any residual juices. Those juices can spread germs to cooked foods.  Use clean utensils and a clean plate to remove cooked meat from the grill.
  • Use a food thermometer to ensure meat is cooked hot enough to kill harmful germs. When smoking, keep temperatures inside the smoker at 225°F to 300°F to keep meat a safe temperature while it cooks.
    • 145°F – whole cuts of beef, pork, lamb, and veal (stand-time of 3 minutes at this temperature)
    • 145°F – fish
    • 160°F – hamburgers and other ground beef
    • 165°F – all poultry and pre-cooked meats, like hot dogs
  • Refrigerate or freeze leftovers within two hours of cooking (one hour if above 90°F outside).

For more food safety information, visit:  https://www.cdc.gov/foodsafety/communication/bbq-iq.html

Food Recall Alert: Tyson & Publix Frozen Fully Cooked Chicken Strips

Approximately 11,829,517 million pounds of frozen, ready-to-eat chicken strip products were recalled by Tyson Foods, Inc. due to potential contamination of extraneous materials, specifically pieces of metal.

Six complaints were filed involving similar pieces of metal with three alleging oral injury.  Anyone concerned about any injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

The frozen, ready-to-eat chicken strip items were produced on various dates from Oct. 1, 2018 through March 8, 2019 and have “Use By Dates” of Oct. 1, 2019 through March 7, 2020.

publix-crispy-chicken-fritters

Consumers with questions about the recall can contact Tyson Foods Consumer Relations at 1.866.886.8456.  For more information, visit:  https://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/recalls-and-public-health-alerts/recall-case-archive/archive/2019/recall-034-2019-exp-release.