Tag Archives: heart disease

Morning News: Heart Health Screenings, Fighting Flu and Vitamin D

DHEC is partnering with the Heart2Heart Foundation on Statewide Screening Day for heart disease risks, including an event in the Upstate:

Heart health evaluations and risk assessments are free to Upstate residents 18 years of age and older.

People can receive a comprehensive screenings  from 7 to 9 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 16 at the Bon Secours Wellness Arena, or The Well.

Dr. Teresa Foo shared the latest about widespread flu cases across the country and in South Carolina:

Doctors with the Department Of Health and Environmental Control describe this year’s flu season as unpredictable and they say the best protection is to get a flu shot.

More than 2,700 cases have been reported statewide since October. During flu season this time last year, there weren’t nearly as many cases, with more than 4,000 reported statewide.

Speaking of flu, a new study finds that Vitamin D may help fortify you against respiratory ailments:

It’s long been known that vitamin D helps protect our bones, but the question of whether taking vitamin D supplements helps guard immunity has been more controversial. An analysis published Wednesday suggests the sunshine vitamin can help reduce the risk of respiratory infections, including colds and flu — especially among people who don’t get enough of the vitamin from diet or exposure to sunlight.

Have A Heart Healthy Valentine’s Day

If you’re planning to give away your heart on Valentine’s Day, make sure it’s healthy!

What better way to say I love you than preparing a healthy homemade meal for the one you love? Make this Valentine’s Day extra special by cooking at home. You will not only spoil that special someone, but you will also keep your heart and body happy by including heart healthy foods.

10 Heart Healthy Foods to Include in your Valentine’s Day plans

  1. Fish
  2. Nuts
  3. Flax Seed
  4. Red Wine
  5. Dark Chocolate
  6. Tofu
  7. Berries
  8. Tomatoes
  9. Beans
  10. Oats

5 Healthy Valentine’s Day Tips

  1. Cook at home: Preparing a meal at home not only keeps your wallet happy but also keeps your body happy. Restaurants add lots of extra fats and salt to foods; when you are the cook you control the ingredients used.
  2. Share Your Sweets: Don’t overindulge in candy and chocolates given by loved ones. Remember there aren’t many nutritious benefits in these treats so watch portion sizes and eat only a small amount. If you need to, share with others to avoid going overboard.
  3. Plan an active date night: Instead on planning your date night around food and treats, do something fun like taking a romantic hike or going on a scenic bike ride.
  4. Think Red: Red is not only the color of love but red foods are good for your heart. Full of antioxidants, fiber, and key vitamins; including red foods can be a great way to celebrate love for each other and your heart.
  5. Don’t Deprive Yourself: Remember that the day is supposed to be focused on spending time with those you love. Enjoy the day and don’t be afraid to eat a small treat to celebrate. Dark Chocolate has been shown to have nutritious properties through its antioxidants benefiting our health.

Happy Valentine’s Day!

Go Red Day: For Women and Heart Health!

The word is finally getting out about the devastating statistics of heart disease in women. As the No. 1 killer of women nationally, heart disease claims the lives of nearly 500,000 women annually in the United States. In 2003, the American Heart Association introduced a new initiative known as “National Wear Red Day” to inform women of the dangers of ignoring their heart health and to teach them how to improve their heart and overall health. “Go Red Day” is held on the first Friday in February and encourages women and men to dress in red clothing to show their support for heart disease awareness.

In the 15 years since the inaugural “National Wear Red Day,” there have been significant accomplishments achieved to reduce the number of women dying from heart disease, including:

  • Nearly 90% of women have made at least one healthy behavior change.
  • More than one-third of women have lost weight.
  • More than 50% of women have increased their exercise.
  • 6 out of 10 women have changed their diets.
  • More than 40% of women have checked their cholesterol levels.
  • One-third of women has talked with their doctors about developing heart health plans.
  • Today, nearly 300 fewer women die from heart disease and stroke each day.
  • Death in women from heart disease has decreased by more than 30 percent over the past 10 years.

Click here to read more about “Go Red Day” and how you can protect yourself from heart disease.

Richland County Chosen as One of Two Counties Nationwide for Million Hearts Initiative

By Jamie Shuster

Email header

Richland County was chosen by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Foundation to serve as one of two pilot counties for the Million Hearts “Healthy is Strong” initiative. Million Hearts is a national initiative from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes by 2017.  The initiative targets African-American men ages 40-65 in Richland County, as well as Clayton County, Georgia.  We’re excited to have been selected as one of two counties nationwide for this initiative.

African-Americans face higher risks than Caucasians of developing high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and heart disease. African-Americans also suffer more stroke deaths, which is the third leading cause of death in South Carolina, resulting in 729 deaths in 2013. These higher illness rates result in ten years of lost life for African-Americans in our state.

Heart attacks and stroke are largely avoidable by managing medical conditions and making lifestyle changes.  This initiative reinforces strong men to put their health first. Simple changes such as taking medication as prescribed, healthy eating, getting regular exercise, and quitting smoking can make a big difference in improving health. Talk to a health care professional about the “ABCS” of heart health:

  • Aspirin use when appropriate
  • Blood pressure control
  • Cholesterol management
  • Smoking cessation

The focus of Million Hearts aligns with the dedicated work and commitment of DHEC’s Bureau of Community Health and Chronic Disease Prevention.

For more information about this initiative, please visit the Million Hearts website.

The Heart Truth About Women in South Carolina

By Cassandra Harris

Midlands Regional Staff

Midlands Regional staff celebrate National Wear Red Day.

Members of our DHEC Midlands team went red this month in a stand against heart disease in women.  Responsible for over 23,000 hospitalizations for women in South Carolina in 2013, with total costs reaching more than $1.2 billion, heart disease is an issue we can’t afford to lose.

Killing 4,351 women in the Palmetto State during 2013, heart disea​se is the second leading cause of death for all women in our state and the leading killer for African-American women. In 2013 alone, 1,216 African-American women died from the disease in South Carolina.

Many people who are at high risk for heart disease don’t know it. By understanding and working to control certain risk factors you can help prevent this disease. Heart yourself, learn the ABC’S to a healthy heart:

  • Appropriate Aspirin therapy
  • Blood pressure control
  • Cholesterol control
  • And Smoking cessation.

In addition to learning your ABC’S, taking steps toward living a healthier lifestyle, like eating healthy and exercising regularly, can help protect your heart health and keep your mind and body active. Make a commitment to change today and prevent heart disease tomorrow. ​

For more information about women and heart disease in South Carolina, go to http://go.usa.gov/3ct6h.