Tag Archives: heart disease

Sleep Is Important For A Healthy Heart

Not only is getting good, quality sleep important to your energy levels, it’s also important for your health, including your heart health.

Sleep plays a key role in helping your body repair itself. Getting enough good sleep also helps you function normally during the day.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers the following tips on sleep.

How much sleep do I need?

Most adults need at least seven hours of sleep each night. Failing to get enough sleep over time can lead to serious health problems.

What health conditions are linked to a lack of sleep?

Adults who sleep less than seven hours each night are more likely to say they have had health problems, including heart attack, asthma, and depression.

What sleep conditions can hurt my heart health?

Sleep apnea happens when your airway gets blocked repeatedly during sleep, causing you to stop breathing for short amounts of time. Sleep apnea affects how much oxygen your body gets while you sleep and increases the risk for many health problems, including high blood pressure, heart attack, and stroke.

Insomnia is trouble falling sleep, staying asleep, or both. As many as one in two adults experiences short-term insomnia at some point, and 1 in 10 may have long-lasting insomnia. Insomnia is linked to high blood pressure and heart disease. Over time, poor sleep can also lead to unhealthy habits that can hurt your heart, including higher stress levels, less motivation to be physically active, and unhealthy food choices.

What can I do to get better sleep?

  • Stick to a regular sleep schedule. Go to bed at the same time each night and get up at the same time each morning, including on the weekends.
  • Get enough natural light, especially earlier in the day. Try going for a morning or lunchtime walk.
  • Get enough physical activity during the day. Try not to exercise within a few hours of bedtime.
  • Avoid artificial light, especially within a few hours of bedtime. Use a blue light filter on your computer or smartphone.
  • Don’t eat or drink within a few hours of bedtime, especially alcohol and foods high in fat or sugar.
  • Keep your bedroom cool, dark, and quiet.

Visit the CDC’s website for more information on getting good sleep.

Walking for World Diabetes Day

DHECDiabetesObservance 2018

Every year, 1.5 million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes in the United States and many additional cases go undiagnosed. In South Carolina, the prevalence of diabetes is about 20 percent higher than the national average.

Diabetes can lead to other serious health conditions, including stroke, heart disease, nerve damage, kidney disease, swelling and edema. Women who had gestational diabetes and their children are more at risk for developing type 2 diabetes later in life. Aside from all of the health risks, diabetes is more expensive. In fact, the average medical expenses among those with diagnosed diabetes is over two times higher than those without diabetes. The good news is that diabetes can be delayed or prevented by eating healthy and staying active.

On Friday, Nov. 16, 2018, DHEC staff from the Mills Jarrett complex in Columbia walked together in observance of World Diabetes Day. (The walk was postponed from the actual date of observance — Nov. 14 — due to rain.) The first sunny day all week, it was a great opportunity to get outside and learn more about World Diabetes Day, which occurs during National Diabetes Month.

The World Diabetes Day campaign focuses on a theme that runs for one or more years and the theme for 2018-19 is Family and Diabetes, which fits in nicely with the theme for National Diabetes Month this year, Promoting Health After Gestational Diabetes.

Employees received different “did you know…” facts about diabetes. While the facts will not teach them everything they need to know about testing or warning signs, the information will at least get the conversation started and hopefully encourage employees to not only think about their health, but the health of their family. With the holiday season in full swing, it is a good time to think about ways to stay healthy during celebrations and have open conversations with family members about health.

For some tips on staying healthy over the holidays, consider the following:

  • Avoid overeating. You can eat a healthy meal before going to a party or practice self-control by only indulging in your favorite treats in moderation.
  • Stay active. Either keep up your normal routine or even try incorporating walks into your gatherings.
  • Keep your stress levels lower. Remember to take time for yourself and relax both your body and mind.

To learn more about World Diabetes Day, visit worlddiabetesday.org and for more information on American Diabetes Month, visit diabetes.org/in-my-community/american-diabetes-month.

From Men’s Health Month to Father’s Day: June Is for the Men

By Chanelle Taylor

There is something special about June. It is Men’s Health Month. It is also the month during which we celebrate Father’s Day, which is June 17 this year. In short, June is for the men.

In June, we celebrate our men and boys and encourage them to seek consultations, participate in age appropriate health screenings, and get adequate exercise for longer, healthier lives.

Men are at a higher risk than women for many preventable health conditions and die an average of five years younger than women. According to the Center for Disease Contron and Prevention (CDC), some of the top causes of death among men include cancer, heart disease, unintentional injuries, diabetes, chronic respiratory disease and stroke.

In an effort to protect and preserve their health, men should:

  • Eat healthy foods; include a variety of fruits and vegetables.
  • Exercise regularly.
  • Visit the doctor.
  • Maintain a healthy work-life balance.
  • Do not use tobacco products. Call 1-800-QUIT-NOW (1-800-784-8669).

Visit the CDC website for more information on Men’s Health Month and men’s health topics.

DHEC in the News: Community baby showers, swimming advisory, heart disease

Here’s a look at health and environmental news from around South Carolina.

Community baby shower draws 100 expectant mothers

Sequoia Rivers waited outside of the Palmetto Electric community room in Ridgeland on Friday, anxious to enter the community baby shower being hosted by Sen. Margie Bright Matthews in partnership with Molina Healthcare of South Carolina.

Rivers, a Ridgeland resident, who is expecting her fourth child, has twins and a 7-year-old child. She said she attended to get the most up-to-date information about what opportunities are available for expectant mothers.

SCDHEC lifts swimming advisory for North Myrtle, Surfside

A temporary ban on swimming along portions of the Grand Strand coast has been lifted, South Carolina Department of Health and Environment Control announced Friday afternoon.

General Interest

Limited health literacy is a major barrier to heart disease prevention and treatment

Limited healthy literacy is a major barrier blocking many people from achieving good cardiovascular health or benefiting from effective treatment for heart attacks, heart failure, strokes and other cardiovascular diseases, according to a scientific statement published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Health literacy encompasses not only the ability to read, but skills such as being able to ask questions about your care, understand documents with medical terminology, perform the basic arithmetic needed to take medication correctly and negotiate with health care providers and insurance companies. Inability to do these things effectively can have serious health consequences.

DHEC in the News: New emergency manager mobile app, swimming advisory, heart disease

Here’s a look at health and environmental news from around South Carolina.

South Carolina emergency managers offer a new disaster app: #SCEMERGENCY

That sense of panic when a storm knocks out the power or you have to evacuate?

The state now has an app for that.

The new #SCEMERGENCY personal manager gives alerts during emergencies and guides users through the countless details of building a disaster kit.

It also identifies which roads to take in an evacuation and where shelters or hotels are open.

Here’s why S.C. warns against swimming along Horry County beaches

The state has issued a swimming advisory for all Horry County beaches following Tropical Storm Alberto.

The Department of Health and Environmental Control issued the warning on Tuesday evening.

“Due to the impact of the amount of rainfall associated with Tropical Storm Alberto, all beaches in Horry County have been placed under a swimming advisory,” the announcement reads.

General Interest

Dealing with heart disease: Exercise and diet

Diet and exercise are two huge factors cited by experts in addressing heart disease, both for young people looking decades ahead and for adults looking to rebound from a medical challenge.

Local teacher Tiffany Middlebrooks, who specializes in health science at Ridge Spring-Monetta Middle/High School, said prevention is a major topic in her classes.