Tag Archives: SCDHEC

South Carolina Health at a Glance: 2018 Live Healthy State Health Assessment Report

South Carolina’s first comprehensive State Health Assessment was drafted last year to create awareness about health issues and opportunities of improvement that impact the overall health of our state.  Because the report is 346 pages, we will tackle the report in upcoming blog posts and provide a brief summary of each section.

Stay tuned for more posts as we break down South Carolina’s health, page by page.

Whose idea was the South Carolina Health Assessment Report?

The Alliance for a Healthier South Carolina, a diverse group of more than 50 state and community leaders and organizations, serves as the backbone organization for Live Healthy South Carolina (LHSC). LHSC brings organizations and leaders together to assess population health outcomes, identify data-driven priorities, and recommend best practices that can be implemented at the state and local levels.   The SC Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) is among this group, providing epidemiology information as well as compiling other health data.

What exactly is the South Carolina Health Assessment Report?

The Live Healthy South Carolina State Health Assessment is a comprehensive description of the health status of South Carolinians and will be used to inform health improvement plans at the state and community levels.  It also serves as a resource for organizations that need access to health data.

Why is this report necessary?

The findings in this assessment can help ensure the opportunity for South Carolina’s health and well-being is a priority.  For everyone who lives, works, worships, and vacations in our great state, the assessment can equip us to make better health decisions as well as meet the challenges of today and tomorrow by contributing to a culture of health that values every South Carolinian.

The assessment summarizes data from the following areas:  demographics, health indicators, leading causes of death and hospitalizations, cross-cutting, access to health care, maternal and infant health, chronic disease and risk factors, infectious disease, injury, physical environment, and behavioral health.

Although this is the first state assessment, the goal is to assess state-level health risk factors and outcomes every three to five years and use the data to identify priority areas to be addressed in South Carolina.

View the comprehensive report:  https://www.livehealthysc.com/uploads/1/2/2/3/122303641/sc_sha_full_report_nov.18.pdf

Beat the Heat: Today is Don’t Fry Day!

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No, we aren’t talking about French fries!  Recognized every year on the Friday before Memorial Day, Don’t Fry Day was established by the National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention to create awareness about sun safety and ultraviolet (UV) ray overexposure.  Protect yourself and kick off this Memorial Day weekend with sunscreen, sunglasses, hats, and umbrellas if you will be outdoors.

Dont Fry Day

Skin cancer has the 5th leading new cases of cancer in South Carolina.  Check the National Weather Service regularly for forecasts and heat index information. Follow these tips to ensure sun safety this summer and enjoy your holiday weekend!

What Do You Know About Arthritis? 5 Fast Facts for Arthritis Awareness Month

Most people think arthritis affects older adults, but did you know that more than half of adults with arthritis are actually younger than 65?  Arthritis affects about 1 in 4 adults in the United States.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as the population ages and obesity increases, the number of adults with arthritis is expected to increase to 78 million by 2040.

  • Arthritis is the nation’s leading cause of disability. The term is used to describe more than 100 diseases and conditions that affect joints, the tissues that surround the joint, and other connective tissue.  Arthritis is common among people with other chronic health conditions, especially obesity, diabetes, and heart disease.
  • Symptoms typically include pain, swelling and stiffness in and around one or more joints. Some forms of arthritis affect the immune system and internal organs.
  • Adults with arthritis in South Carolina has consistently increased from 2011 to 2016, still harboring above the national average (see Figure 6.13)
  • Women in South Carolina have a higher prevalence of arthritis (33.2%) than males (26.7).
  • Prevent arthritis by staying active and maintaining a healthy weight. Early diagnosis and appropriate management of the disease can help people live well without pain.  Simple movement, such as walking, is recommended for at least 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week is recommended.

Adults with Arthritis_SC Health Assessment

Take the CDC Arthritis Quiz to test your knowledge or visit https://www.cdc.gov/features/arthritisawareness/index.html to learn more about Arthritis Awareness Month.

Grill The Right Way This Summer

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Did you know that food poisoning peaks in the summer months due to warmer temperatures causing foodborne germs to spread?  Memorial Day Weekend is right around the corner.  Avoid food poisoning by taking the necessary precautions when grilling.  Follow these steps from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to ensure you are cooking the healthy way:

  • Separate meat, poultry, and seafood in your shopping cart and grocery bags to guard against cross-contamination. Put packages of raw meat and poultry into individual plastic bags.
  • Keep meat, poultry, and seafood refrigerated until ready to grill. When transporting, keep below 40 degrees Fahrenheit in an insulated cooler.
  • Wash your hands with soap BEFORE and AFTER handling raw meat, poultry, and seafood. Wash work surfaces, utensils, and the grill before and after cooking.
  • Clean your grill and tools. Use a moist cloth to clean the surface before cooking.
  • When using marinades and sauces that have touched raw meat, pour out any residual juices. Those juices can spread germs to cooked foods.  Use clean utensils and a clean plate to remove cooked meat from the grill.
  • Use a food thermometer to ensure meat is cooked hot enough to kill harmful germs. When smoking, keep temperatures inside the smoker at 225°F to 300°F to keep meat a safe temperature while it cooks.
    • 145°F – whole cuts of beef, pork, lamb, and veal (stand-time of 3 minutes at this temperature)
    • 145°F – fish
    • 160°F – hamburgers and other ground beef
    • 165°F – all poultry and pre-cooked meats, like hot dogs
  • Refrigerate or freeze leftovers within two hours of cooking (one hour if above 90°F outside).

For more food safety information, visit:  https://www.cdc.gov/foodsafety/communication/bbq-iq.html

Food Recall Alert: Tyson & Publix Frozen Fully Cooked Chicken Strips

Approximately 11,829,517 million pounds of frozen, ready-to-eat chicken strip products were recalled by Tyson Foods, Inc. due to potential contamination of extraneous materials, specifically pieces of metal.

Six complaints were filed involving similar pieces of metal with three alleging oral injury.  Anyone concerned about any injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

The frozen, ready-to-eat chicken strip items were produced on various dates from Oct. 1, 2018 through March 8, 2019 and have “Use By Dates” of Oct. 1, 2019 through March 7, 2020.

publix-crispy-chicken-fritters

Consumers with questions about the recall can contact Tyson Foods Consumer Relations at 1.866.886.8456.  For more information, visit:  https://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/recalls-and-public-health-alerts/recall-case-archive/archive/2019/recall-034-2019-exp-release.