Category Archives: Environment

DHEC in the News: West Nile, septic tanks, abandoned boats

Here’s a look at health and environmental news from around South Carolina.

DHEC: West Nile and Mosquitos Still a Problem in SC

COLUMBIA, SC (WOLO)–The calendar may say October but the temperatures have felt more like the middle of summer and that’s why State Health and City officials don’t want you to let your guard down when it comes to mosquitos.

DHEC says there has been an increase in the number of mosquitos infected with West Nile this year.

According to DHEC, human cases of West Nile have been confirmed in Anderson, Beaufort, Greenville, Horry, Laurens, Lexington, Richland, Spartanburg, Union, and York counties.

General Interest

Plan underway to eliminate septic tanks, decrease sewage leaks

In a move to stop sewage from leaking into our local waterways, a local town is offering financial assistance for people to get rid of septic tanks.

It’s a picture perfect place to paddle board, but be careful not to ingest the water around Shem Creek.

Tired of seeing Hilton Head’s Broad Creek used as a ‘Dumpster’? 3 residents step up to remove abandoned boats.

After waiting nearly a year, a group of Hilton Head Island residents are taking it upon themselves to clean up boats that were abandoned in the Broad Creek.

After Hurricane Matthew destroyed Palmetto Bay Marina last year, the number of boats moored in the Broad Creek nearly doubled. The legal process to deem the boats abandoned only started a couple weeks ago and will take months to complete.

DHEC in the News: Flu, Clemson’s solar-powered mobile health clinic, minimizing breast cancer risks

Here’s a look at health and environmental news from around South Carolina.

You should get a flu shot now, SC health officials say; here’s where you can go

As the temperature dips in York, Lancaster and Chester counties, it’s time to get a flu vaccination, say experts with the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC).

According to DHEC and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), vaccinations are recommended annually for everyone six months or older. Those who are older than 50, pregnant or have chronic medical conditions such as asthma or heart disease are at an increased risk of complications from influenza, according to DHEC.

Clemson’s mobile health clinic powered by the sun

The mission of Clemson University’s new mobile health clinic is to improve the health of the underserved community while providing a teaching experience for public health students.

But as “the world’s first 100-percent solar powered clinic,” it’s also tasked with improving the environment.

The specially designed 23-by-16-foot truck is outfitted with eight solar panels on the roof that charge the entire clinic, eliminating polluting exhaust fumes and noise, said health extension agent Logan McFall.

Healthy eating, exercise help women minimize breast cancer risks

In my role as a breast imaging physician, I am asked frequently what increases my patients’ breast cancer risk. … Although many factors are not in a woman’s control, adopting as healthy a lifestyle as possible is the common sense approach for women’s breast health.

DHEC in the News: EMS services, hospital award, recreational shellfish season

Here’s a look at health and environmental news from around South Carolina.

Counties balance time, money in EMS services

When an emergency occurs, any wait is too long.

That’s why county officials say they need to keep fully staffed emergency medical services operations. But it’s getting harder.

Carolinas Hospital System recognized for patient safety record

FLORENCE, SC – Carolinas Hospital System has earned four South Carolina “Certified Zero Harm Award” from the South Carolina Hospital Association (SCHA). The award is in recognition of the facility’s exemplary performance for patient safety in preventing hospital acquired infections.

Recreational shellfish season delayed until Oct. 15

South Carolina’s recreational shellfish harvesting season has been delayed for two weeks because of Hurricane Irma’s impact on coastal water quality.

DHEC in the News: Teen birth rate, Charleston Water System’s 100th anniversary, rabies

Here’s a look at health and environmental news from around South Carolina.

Teen birth rate continues to drop in South Carolina

The teen birth rate in South Carolina continues to decline, new numbers published by the S.C. Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy show.

Between 2015 and 2016, the teen birth rate in the state dropped by 9 percent. Last year, looking specifically at the 15- to 19-year-old cohort, an average 23.8 of every 1,000 females gave birth.

On 100th anniversary, Charleston Water System digs up a bit of its well water past

Charleston soon will mark a modern milestone: The 100th anniversary of the city’s owning its own water system.

To observe the October occasion, the Charleston Water System isn’t burying a time capsule but it has been digging one up.

1 person potentially exposed to rabies by cat in Greenville Co.

SIMPSONVILLE, SC (WSPA) – The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control says that one person was potentially exposed to rabies by a stray cat that tested positive for the disease.

DHEC says that two stray cats were seen fighting before one turned on the victim, who was scratched.

DHEC in the News: mass trauma triage kits, Folly Beach Irma recovery

Here’s a look at health and environmental news from around South Carolina.

Upstate firefighters equipped with color-coded triage kits for mass trauma situations

GREENVILLE, SC (FOX Carolina) – As a firefighter and EMT, Chris Hearn has seen a lot.

“When you’re actually doing it, I guess adrenaline kicks in and you don’t think about it,” Chris Hearn said.

He’s a firefighter with the Boiling Springs Fire Department in Greenville County and has worn the uniform for more than 20 years.

“It just comes natural,” he said.

He hopes a day like the chaos and mass shooting in Las Vegas never happens in the Upstate. However, if it does he and other firefighters are ready.

General Interest

Winds, waves cause new erosion at Folly Beach as city works on Irma recovery

FOLLY BEACH — New erosion has added to the island’s post-storm woes.

The beach near the pier has “scarping.” It drops o a foot or more close to the sea. Three days of steady northeast winds and strong surf played a role.

“Any setback right now is bigger than it would be otherwise just because of what we just went through,” said Mayor Tim Goodwin.

Tropical Storm Irma caused severe erosion when it hit in mid-September. Dunes from the east to the west end of the island were reduced or destroyed. Goodwin said the beach loss was worse than from Hurricane Matthew a year ago.