Tag Archives: summer

From Other Blogs: Treating Minor Burns, Summer Safety, and Preventing Swimmer’s Ear

A collection of health and environmental posts from other governmental blogs.

How to Treat a Minor Burn

We have all done it – remembered to put sunscreen on the kids but not on ourselves. Or thought the cookie sheet pan was cool when it wasn’t. All ending in a burn.  Prisma Health Nurse Practitioner Katie Schill said most burns will resolve in 1–2 weeks with some at-home treatment.

– From Flourish, Prisma Health’s Blog

 

Six Ways to Ruin Your Summer Fun!

Ahhh, summer… when the weather’s nice, the birds are singing and the ways to endanger your health are many. Here are six things that can ruin your summer fun and simple steps that you can take to prevent them from happening. – From Public Health Matters, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)’s Blog

 

How to prevent and treat swimmer’s ear

Summer is a great time for fun in the water, unless you end up with swimmer’s ear, a common type of outer ear infection.  Prisma Health Nurse Practitioner Katie Schill said, “Despite its name, swimmer’s ear is not necessarily caused by swimming. It’s caused by any introduction of bacteria into the ear canal. This can happen by scratching the ear canal when removing wax or just scratching an itchy ear.”  To prevent swimmer’s ear, Katie offers this advice. – From Flourish, Prisma Health’s Blog

Traveling the Safe and Healthy Way

Warm temperatures, a break from school and extended daylight make June through August a peak travel season. Traveling locally or internationally, it can be a transformative and unforgettable experience, but if not properly prepared, you may encounter some preventable health risks.

Conducting thorough research about the health risks of your destination is a vital step in preparing for a trip. If traveling internationally, research vaccinations you may need and how to receive them. It is essential that you arrange vaccinations or medications to protect against diseases prominent in the region at least four to six weeks before traveling. Contracting diseases such as hepatitis, typhoid and malaria can be prevented by a simple vaccination. Many countries legally require tourists to undergo specific vaccinations, such as yellow fever, before they are allowed entry. Your doctor will administer a vaccine based on your age and medical history. Make sure you are up-to-date on your vaccines and healthy.

Travelers with chronic illnesses, disabilities, weakened immune systems, and senior citizens should take extra precautions such as:

  • Ensuring all necessary medications are safe and secure in a travel kit with them while they travel
  • Packing a list of emergency contact numbers for physicians and loved ones
  • Locating the nearest clinic or hospital closest to your travel destination
  • Keeping your health insurance information on hand in case you need it
  • Understanding your personal food allergies and the quality of food and water in your travels

If traveling by airplane, place your medications in your carry-on bag in case of an emergency. Your medication may not be available in the area you are visiting, so bring enough medication to last the entire trip and extra in case of delays, as well as a copy of your prescription. In the case of a food allergy, travel with a food allergy ID card that indicates your allergies both in English and the language(s) of the country in which you may travel.

Traveling does not have to be a burden if you stay prepared.  Check out our International Travel Q&A page for more information.

From Other Blogs: Nutrition Tips for Men, Summer Camp Food Safety, Cancer Prevention for Older Adults

A collection of health and environmental posts from other governmental blogs.

Nutrition tips all men should know

For many men, nutrition is not a focus until much later in life. Because it’s best to start healthy habits as soon as possible, Lisa Money, registered dietitian nutritionist with Apex Athletic Performance, explains the importance of good nutrition throughout every stage of a man’s life.– From Flourish, Prisma Health’s blog

Keeping Hands Clean and Summer Camp Trip Foods Safe

Does your child’s summer camp itinerary include outdoorsy trips that require them to bring snacks? How will you fulfill their taste buds while keeping perishable snacks safe? How will you make sure kids will clean their hands before eating? These trips will probably be in hot, sunny weather, and that can come with food safety risks. Let’s keep calm and be food safe this summer! – From U.S. Department of Agriculture’s blog

The Value of Prevention Does Not End at 65

“Medical science deserves hearty congratulations for extending the lifespan of Americans to 80 years and beyond. This is truly an impressive feat, considering that most babies born in 1900 did not live past the age of 50.  I rejoice in my own longevity, as I’m sure you do. But I also wonder whether the same health care system that gave me these extra years is doing its best to help me make sure those years are healthy ones.  Frankly, I have my doubts.” Robyn Stone, DrPH

– From The Topic is Cancer, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Blog

From Other Blogs: Men’s health, carbon monoxide poisoning, the truth about juice & more

A collection of health and environmental posts from other governmental blogs.

Tips for men to protect their health

Men, you and your health go hand in hand. As a reminder to make sure you are living a healthy life, here are tips to help you protect your health and well-being.

Cecelia M. Baskett, MD, family medicine physician at Lakeview Family Medicine, said, “Unfortunately, I see men who have neglected their health and now have advanced stage of disease because they did not come in to be screened. It is beneficial to everyone’s health to see a family medicine or internist every few years at a minimum. Many times we can help you prevent long-term negative effects on your lifestyle if you come in.” — From Flourish, Palmetto Health’s blog

Carbon Monoxide (CO) Poisoning Prevention

When power outages occur after severe weather, using alternative sources of power can cause carbon monoxide (CO) to build up in a home and poison the people and animals inside.

Every year, at least 430 people die in the U. S. from accidental CO poisoning. Approximately 50,000 people in the U.S. visit the emergency department each year due to accidental CO poisoning. There are steps you can take to help protect yourself and your household from CO poisoning. — From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Your Health — Your Environment blog

Squeezing the truth out of juice

Juice. We all have our favorite, whether it’s grape, apple, orange, pineapple, tropical punch. . .the list goes on and on. Everywhere we go, we’re reminded of its evil sweetness. Just walk into any grocery store and you will find an entire side of an aisle devoted to juices of infinite variety, all of it boxed, bottled and canned in the most colorful, eye-popping and kid-appealing ways.

Thanks to industry marketing tactics, many people continue to think juice is actually a healthy drink option for their kids. — From Flourish, Palmetto Health’s blog

USDA’s Meat and Poultry Hotline Keeps You “Food Safe” in the Summer!

Whether it’s a family BBQ, camping, hiking or going to the beach, summer activities can get hot! When food is a part of those activities, keep in mind the old saying: Safety first!

USDA’s Meat and Poultry Hotline is here to help you with food safety for all your summer plans. It has been assisting Americans with all types of food safety questions and concerns since 1985. Here are just a few… — From the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) blog

5 Common Flood Insurance Myths

The National Flood Insurance Program has worked to protect the life you’ve built for the past 50 years and will continue to do so into the future.  Don’t let rumors and myths drive your decisions.

Here are the five most common myths about flood insurance. — From the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) blog

From Other Blogs: Keeping cool in hot weather, avoiding uninvited guests at summer outings, using trauma-informed care to inform emergency preparedness and response

A collection of health and environmental posts from other governmental blogs.

Keep Your Cool in Hot Weather

Now is the time to prepare for the high temperatures that kill hundreds of people every year. Extreme heat causes more than 600 deaths each year. Heat-related deaths and illness are preventable, yet many people still die from extreme heat every year.

Take measures to stay cool, remain hydrated, and keep informed. Getting too hot can make you sick. You can become ill from the heat if your body can’t compensate for it and properly cool you off.  The main things affecting your body’s ability to cool itself during extremely hot weather are … — From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Your Health – Your Environment blog

How to Avoid Uninvited Guests at Your Summer Outing

In the summertime, as the weather begins to heat up, our microscopic friends, called bacteria, begin to make uninvited appearances at our cookouts, picnics and even camping trips. Sometimes these little friends can be helpful, but other times, they just make you sick.

Bacteria will grow anywhere they have access to nutrients and water. Microorganisms that cause disease are called pathogens. When certain pathogens enter the food supply, they can cause foodborne illness. – From the US Department of Agriculture blog

Using trauma-informed care to guide emergency preparedness and response

Exposure to a traumatic event or set of circumstances can negatively affect a person’s mental, physical, social, emotional or spiritual well-being for a long time after the initial incident. We know that not all individuals respond to trauma in the same way and we know that individuals with a history of trauma, especially childhood trauma, are more likely to experience psychological distress and are at increased risk for the development of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) with future exposure to trauma. – From the CDC’s Public Health Matters blog